Pioneer Water Tanks: The Benefit of Storing Water For Fire Protection Under NFPA 22 with Brandi Whitaker, Account and Business Development Manager

As presented at the 2024 NFPA National Fire Protection Association in Orlando, Florida. Link to follow.

 

What is NFPA 22?

The NFPA® 22 Standard for Water Tanks for Private Fire Protection sets the minimum requirements for the design, construction, installation, and maintenance of water tanks and their accessories.

The NFPA Committee on Gravity Tanks established the Standard on Gravity Tanks in 1909, with subsequent amendments and revisions adopted up to 1950. Over time, the standard broadened to encompass tanks beyond gravity tanks, including metal tanks, pressure tanks, and tank heating.

The 1993 edition introduced environmentally friendly requirements for tank-coating systems applicable to metal tanks. New chapters were added to cover the design and erection of bolted steel tanks, concrete tanks, and fiberglass tanks, aligning with contemporary water storage tank design practices.

Subsequent editions, including those in 1996, 1998, 2003, 2008, and 2013, addressed issues such as tank care, maintenance, corrosion resistance, and environmental concerns specific to metal tanks. Changes were made to improve user-friendliness and align with industry standards, including updates to sizing requirements, acceptance test procedures, and terminology definitions for metal tanks.

Pioneer Water Tanks America at the NFPA 2022 Conference and Expo
Pioneer Water Tanks America complies with NFPA 22 requirements

 

Wild Fires

During a wildfire, access to water for firefighting efforts is essential. Backup water sources, such as tanks or reservoirs, provide firefighters with additional water to suppress flames, protect property, and prevent the spread of the fire.

Wildfires can disrupt or damage infrastructure, including water supply systems. Having backup water protection ensures redundancy in the water supply, reducing reliance on potentially vulnerable primary water sources. This redundancy is critical for maintaining firefighting capabilities, especially in remote or rural areas where access to water may be limited.

Knowing that there is a backup water source available in case of a wildfire provides peace of mind to residents, businesses, and emergency responders. It adds an additional layer of preparedness and can contribute to more effective wildfire responses.


 XL 25/03 Pioneer Water Tank in Surfmist® COLORBOND® steel for Fire Protection
XL 25/03 Pioneer Water Tank in Surfmist® COLORBOND® steel
for Fire Protection

Job Name: Madera Travel Center

Model: XL 25/03 Pioneer Water Tank in Surfmist® COLORBOND® steel

Location: Madera, California

One tank will act as a reserve for fire protection in case of an emergency. The water supply will feed a fire sprinkler system pump adjacent to the tank. The pump provides pressurized water to the truck stop building.


Model XLE 50/03 Pioneer Water Tank
Model XLE 50/03 Pioneer Water Tank

Location: Anaheim, California

Model XLE 50/03 Pioneer Water Tank

This fire protection system was required by Orange County for fire flow. The commercial fire protection system was installed on-site in two days with a proprietary jacking system. The system was installed in November 2018 with a 100,000-gallon effective capacity for fire protection.


 

Public Supply is not Sufficient

In areas with low water pressure, installing a hydrant may necessitate costly upgrades to the water supply system to ensure adequate pressure for firefighting purposes. A water storage tank can provide consistent water pressure regardless of external factors, potentially eliminating the need for expensive pressure upgrades.

Private residences and businesses can fight fires with the safety of water stored on site when public systems might not have enough water or the ability to connect water to the location.

Rainwater Harvested Fire Tanks can act as a backup when there is no water on site to use.

NFPA 22 Chapter 4 – Water Sources (4.2):

The water source for filling the tank needs to be adequate and dependable, with allowance for its reliability in the future. Suppose the water supply from a public service main isn’t adequate in quality, quantity, or pressure (measured in fire flow for fire protection). In that case, an alternative water source needs to be provided (like an extra water storage tank on the property).

NFPA 13 A.23.2.1(g)

The capture of rainwater is generally not considered a problem since NFPA 13 has long allowed the use of open lakes, rivers, and ponds, which are nothing more than an open collection of rainwater and melted snow.


Model: XLR 30/02 Pioneer Water Tank
Model: XLR 30/02 Pioneer Water Tank

Job Name: Hunt Volunteer Fire Department

Model: XLR 30/02 Pioneer Water Tank

Location: Hunt, Texas

The Hunt Volunteer Fire Department utilizes a Pioneer Water Tank to fill up trucks and as an onsite water source. The antivortex nozzles and engineering of the tank enable the immense amount of pressure needed to fill up trucks.


NFPA 1142 in relation to NFPA 22

NFPA 1142 specifies water supplies for firefighting purposes in rural and suburban areas. This is typically defined as within areas that have less than 500 – 1000 people per square mile. If the water structure is unable to supply a minimum of 250gpm at 20psi above the average domestic use, supplemented water supplies may be required. The NFPA 1142 standard may also be implemented whenever the AHJ, the authority having jurisdiction, requires it.

Pioneer Water Tanks NFPA 22 Private Fire Protection Tanks
Pioneer Water Tanks Provide Water Storage for Fire Protection

Pioneer Water Tanks are utilized as water supplies for firefighting, following NFPA 1142. Pioneer Water Tanks are a reliable water supply that stands ready to provide water consistently in case of emergencies and for daily domestic use. The wide array of fire connections is configurable based on the project requirements including antivortex nozzles and hydrant hookups.

“Cisterns should have a minimum usable volume as determined by the AHJ, based on the methods described in Chapter 4. There is no real limit to the maximum capacity.” NFPA 1142 Annex B.4.1


Model XLR23/02 to be used at the fire station
Model XLR23/02 to be used at the fire station

Job Name: Central Community Volunteer Fire Department

Location: Weatherford, TX

Model XLR23/02 to be used at the fire station.

Included: Fire fittings are included on the Pioneer Water Tank that will store rainwater for later use at the fire station.


Model Two XLR 23/02 Pioneer Water Tanks
Model Two XLR 23/02 Pioneer Water Tanks

 

Location: Briggs, Texas

Model Two XLR 23/02 Pioneer Water Tanks

Water was used to refill water trucks for the Briggs Texas Fire Department using rain catchment from the roof of the building.


 

Cost Effective

 

Residences and businesses have used water tanks in lieu of other fire fighting requirements such as Sprinklers or adding a hydrant to a property in order to save cost up front and over time.

Installation Costs:

Water tanks typically have lower installation costs compared to sprinkler systems. Sprinkler systems require extensive piping, fittings, and labor for installation throughout the building, while water tanks can often be installed externally with simpler plumbing connections.

Installing a hydrant requires not only the hydrant itself but also underground piping to connect it to the water supply system. This piping can be costly, especially if the property is far from existing water mains. In contrast, a water storage tank may require less infrastructure, depending on its location relative to the property.

Maintenance Costs:

While the initial investment in a water storage tank may be higher than installing a hydrant, the long-term costs of maintenance and operation can be lower. Water storage tanks typically require less maintenance and have lower ongoing operational expenses compared to hydrants, which may require periodic testing, maintenance, and repairs.

Water tanks generally have lower ongoing maintenance costs than sprinkler systems. Sprinkler systems require periodic inspections, testing, and maintenance to ensure they are functioning correctly, which can incur additional expenses over time.


Model: XLR50/02 Pioneer Water Tank
Model: XLR50/02 Pioneer Water Tank

Job Name: Austin Wood Recycling

Model: XLR50/02 Pioneer Water Tank

Location: North Hays County Texas

Water was used for Fire Protection required by the local Fire Marshal. The Pioneer Water Tanks with accessories fulfilled the requirement for the building permit.


Model XLE23/02 Pioneer Water Tank that is required for a business
Model XLE23/02 Pioneer Water Tank that is required for a business

Job Name: Icehouse

Location: Krum, TX

Model XLE23/02 – Required for their business

Included: 6″ Outlet w/ Anti-Vortex Plate and 6″ OS&Y Gate Valve, Fixed Ladder & Access Hatch, Roof Vent, 6″ Overflow, Level Gauge, and Auto-refill Float Valve for filling with well water.


Model: Two XLR50/02 Pioneer Water Tanks
Model: Two XLR50/02 Pioneer Water Tanks

Location: North Hays County Texas

Model: Two XLR50/02 Pioneer Water Tanks

Water was used as a dual purpose for both fire fighting and domestic potable water. The tank is approved by the North Hays County Fire Marshal’s office for a letter to the homeowner’s insurance company to assist with a discount for having water available to fight a fire.


 

Pioneer Water Tanks America is ready to provide top-tier water storage solutions with our network of local providers.

Call Now (877) 223-7784





     


     

     

    Tanks Alot along with a local USDA office facilitated a rainwater harvesting system that utilizes Pioneer Water Tanks America for storage. “The system installed by the Alabama Coushatta Tribe of Texas will allow them to harvest and store 65,000 gallons of rainwater which will be used for wildfire mitigation, irrigation of a community garden, and dust abatement in an arena adjacent to the Veteran’s Pavilion.” Read the full story with the U.S. Department of Agriculture:

    https://www.climatehubs.usda.gov/hubs/southern-plains/topic/rainwater-harvesting-tribal-partnership-project

    The rainwater harvesting system collects rainwater off of the Veterans Pavilion rooftop. The Veterans Pavilion is a community gathering space that already exists. The Bureau of Indian Affairs Southern Plains Region (BIA) funded the cost of materials for the project and the Alabama-Coushatta Wildland Fire Fighting Crew Tribal members provided the labor.

    Tanks Alot With The USDA Provides A Pioneer Water Tanks America Rainwater System For The Alabama-Coushatta Tribe Of Texas
    Tanks Alot With the USDA Provides Pioneer Water Tanks America within a Rainwater System for the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe Of Texas

    Tanks Alot, an Authorized Master Dealer, supplied the XLE 50/02 Pioneer Water Tank with a capacity of 65,000 gallons. At the time of the article’s publishing, around 32,500 gallons or about half of the Pioneer Water Tank had already been filled from rainfall.

    Rainwater is a clean, nearly neutral pH water source that sustainability utilizes what would otherwise become stormwater runoff. Rainwater harvesting is the collection of rain off of a building roof with conveyance into storage for later use. Rainwater can be used as a drinking water source, for irrigation, livestock, wildlife, fire protection, or even released back into the ground after the rain.

    The state of Texas has one of the most comprehensive laws authorizing rainwater harvesting, the Texas House Bill 3391. House Bill 3391 (2011) governs rainwater collection and stipulates that systems that do not require a water rights permit for potable and non-potable use.

    In 2001, Texas excluded components of rainwater harvesting systems from sales tax, in Section 151.355 of the Texas Tax Code. Link to the Teas sales tax exemption form: https://pioneerwatertanksamerica.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/01-339.pdf

     

    Learn more about the water solutions that Tanks Alot provides at TANKSALOTTX.com

    Tanks Alot logo


    Tanks Alot is ready to provide top-tier water solutions including rainwater systems and Pioneer Water Tank sales.

    Call Now (830) 331-7330

       


       

       

      Rainwater harvesting companies, well water, irrigation, agriculture, and businesses providing fire protection services attended the 2024 Pioneer Water Tanks America Dealer Conference: Made Possible Together. Company representatives came from as far as Australia and across America such as Hawaii, Arizona, Georgia, and Florida.

      We celebrated this past year’s achievements and recognized the leaders in our network with the Pioneer Water Tanks America Dealer and Installer Awards 2024. Thank you from all of us at Pioneer Water Tanks America for our network’s continued growth and support as valued members of Team Pioneer!

      Pioneer Water Tanks America Conference 2024
      Pioneer Water Tanks America Conference 2024

      We created the Six-Figure Club to recognize the success of our network. This club exemplifies what it takes to Make Pioneer Water Tanks Possible Together on top of our network of water professionals’ valued profit progress.

      This year, we were proud to announce an addition to our awards, the Quarter-Million Club. Achieving this milestone was unimaginable 11 years ago so today, we are grateful that our network chose Pioneer Water Tanks America.

      Congratulations to our network of water professionals for being a part of the 2024 Six-Figure Club and the Quarter-Million Club with Pioneer Water Tanks America!

      We celebrate this past year’s achievements and recognize the leaders in our network with the Pioneer Water Tanks America Dealer and Installer Awards 2024. Thank you from all of us at Pioneer Water Tanks America for your continued growth and support as a valued member of Team Pioneer!


      TOP TEXAS DEALER

      2024 Pioneer Water Tanks America

      Presented To

      Harvest Rain

      https://harvestrain.com/


      TOP CALIFORNIA DEALER

      2024 Pioneer Water Tanks America

      Presented To

      Green Rubber Kennedy AG logo

      Green Rubber Kennedy AG

      https://greenrubber.com/


      TOP INTERNATIONAL DEALER

      2024 Pioneer Water Tanks America

      Presented To

      APROMSA

      APROMSA Logo

      https://apromsa.com/


      TOP HAWAII DEALER

      2024 Pioneer Water Tanks America

      Presented To

      Pacific Blue Catchment

      Pacific Blue Catchment Logo

      https://www.pacificbluecatchment.org/


      TOP SALES OTHER REGIONS

      2024 Pioneer Water Tanks America

      Presented To

      Oasis Water Harvesting

      Oasis Water Harvesting Logo

      https://www.oasisrainwaterharvesting.com/


      TOP SALES GROWTH

      2024 Pioneer Water Tanks America

      Presented To

      NC Tanks


      TOP NEW DEALER

      2024 Pioneer Water Tanks America

      Presented To

      Freedom Rainwater

      Freedom Rainwater Logo

      https://freedomrainwater.com/


      BEST BUSINESS BRANDING

      2024 Pioneer Water Tanks America

      Presented To

      APROMSA

      APROMSA Logo

      https://apromsa.com/


      CUSTOMER SERVICE AWARD

      2024 Pioneer Water Tanks America

      Presented To

      Cqure Water, Quinn Rockrohr

      Cqure Water Logo

      https://cqurewater.com/


      INSTALLATION EXCELLENCE AWARD

      2024 Pioneer Water Tanks America

      Presented To

      Mercenary Construction


      Dan Fleming with ARain Dance Construction
      Dan Fleming with ARain Dance Construction

      Rainwater companies from Hawaii and systems in California are using water tanks manufactured in Australia because, from the beginning, Dan Fleming with ARain Dance Construction, installed Pioneer Water Tanks professionally and with precision. Dan was in charge of the initial installation of Pioneer Water Tanks. Thanks to Dan Fleming and his installation team, the top-tier standards for installation are elevated. Our network maintaining standards progresses the network of Pioneer Water Tanks America water professionals that we are today.

      This is why today we, the team of Pioneer Water Tanks America do hereby recognize Dan Fleming with ARain Dance Construction as the King of 2024. Defender of the Professional Pioneer Installation, we beseech Tanks by whom Kings and Queens do reign to bless His Majesty with a long and happy 2024 to reign over us.


      Thank You to Our 2024 Pioneer Dealer Conference Sponsors

      This year’s Pioneer Dealer conference has been our largest event yet and we’re grateful to our sponsors for helping to make this happen! Our sponsors agree that the Pioneer dealer conference gives their company network-wide brand exposure and high visibility with water industry-relevant companies.


      ARGCO
      RAINFALL SPONSOR

      ARGCO Logo

      ARGCO specializes in providing quality items to industrial trades, and professionals with outstanding service.
      ARGCO Website » https://argco.com/

       


      RAINWATER EQUIPMENT, LLC WITH SUPPORT FROM DAB PUMPS AND LUMINOR
      RAINWATER DELUGE SPONSOR

      Rainwater Equipment is a North American supplier of DAB pumps, Luminor UV systems, floating suction filters, and much more, offering product selection assistance, installer discounted pricing and fast shipping.
      RAINWATER EQUIPMENT Website » https://rainwaterequipment.com/

      DAB Pumps Website » https://dabpumps.us/

      Luminor UV Systems » https://www.luminoruv.com/

       



      BARTLETT TANK LINERS
      MOONSOON SPONSOR

      Bartlett manufactures the AQUALINER® Fresh and Industratex tank liners that are exclusive to Pioneer Water Tanks.
      Bartlett Tank Liners Website » https://bartlett.net.au/bartlett-tank-liners/

       



      KARRGO FREIGHT SYSTEMS, INC.
      RAINFALL SPONSOR

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      Karrgo Freight Systems, Inc. brings over 30 years of experience in the freight business including driver, operations, marketing, and management.
      Karrgo Website » https://www.karrgo.com/

       



      VIQUA UV SYSTEMS
      RAINFALL SPONSOR

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      With over 600,000 installations around the world, VIQUA is one of the most recognized and respected brands of residential and light commercial UV water systems.
      Email VIQUA Kevin Kahlden »

       


      Pioneer Water Tanks America is ready to provide top-tier water storage solutions with our network of local providers. If your company is interested in joining the network of Authorized Dealers and Installers, please fill out the form below or call our office.

      Call Now (877) 223-7784

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        For general Pioneer Water Tank inquiries and to be connected with a local dealer, please fill out the form below.

        Call Now (877) 223-7784





           

           

           

          Pioneer Water Tanks America is grateful to announce becoming a Texas Champion with the Take Care of Texas Proud Partner program. Our team is committed to protecting and conserving the Texas environment in action. We appreciate this opportunity to help engage Texans in making a difference in environmental preservation.

          https://takecareoftexas.org/partners/proud-partner-list

          The contributions of Pioneer Water Tanks America include BPA-free reusable water bottles and rainwater gauges that were given to the TCEQ Take Care of Texas program. Our team attends water, first responder, safety, and environmental-focused events where we promote conservation with rainwater harvesting and proper recycling.

          Take Care of Texas Pioneer Water Tanks America
          Take Care of Texas Logo with Pioneer Water Tanks America

          “I am so excited that Pioneer Water Tanks will be a part of the Take Care of Texas program through TCEQ. It is always so great to know that we are making a difference for all Texans and the water industry.” – Brandi Whitaker, Account Manager

          In September 2023, we participated in the Hays County Annual Emergency Preparedness Fair in Kyle, Texas. Our team handed out kids’ activity books, stickers, reusable water bottles, rainwater gauges, and rainwater manuals. The resources and kid’s activities promote water conservation and rainwater harvesting as a sustainable water source. Families came to enjoy an Apache helicopter demo, a firefighter chili cook-off, and more while meeting their Hays County emergency first responders.

          Pioneer Water Tanks at Hays County Annual Emergency Preparedness Fair
          Pioneer Water Tanks
          at Hays County Annual Emergency Preparedness Fair

          Promoting rainwater harvesting as a sustainable water source is an important goal of Pioneer Water Tanks America. Rainwater systems utilize rooftop space for collection, conveying the water into storage for later use. Rainwater systems utilize Pioneer Water Tanks for clean, safe water storage around the world and across Texas. Rainwater systems can supplement water use, reduce municipal water use, mitigate stormwater issues, and provide a water source where there aren’t other options.

          > Learn more about rainwater harvesting with Pioneer Water Tanks for safe, clean storage

          TCEQ Pioneer Water Tanks America Take Care of Texas
          TCEQ Pioneer Water Tanks America Take Care of Texas

          Texas offers many resources on rainwater harvesting including:

          a. AgriLife Extension Rainwater Harvesting Manual https://rainwaterharvesting.tamu.edu/publications/

          b. The Texas Water Development Board Rainwater Harvesting Manual https://www.twdb.texas.gov/publications/brochures/conservation/doc/RainwaterHarvestingManual_3rdedition.pdf

          c. Rainwater Harvesting Potential and Guidelines for Texas, by Texas Water Development Board https://www.edwardsaquifer.net/pdf/RainwaterCommitteeFinalReport.pdf

           

          Texas has one of the most comprehensive laws protecting rainwater harvesting, the Texas House Bill 3391. In 2001, Texas excluded components of rainwater harvesting systems from sales tax, Section 151.355 of the Texas Tax Code.

          To claim this exemption, the purchaser must furnish a Tax Exemption Application Form 01‐339 to the supplier at the time of purchase.

          Link: Texas Sales-Tax Exemption Form https://pioneerwatertanksamerica.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/01-339.pdf


          Pioneer Water Tanks America is ready to provide top-tier water storage solutions with our network of local providers.

          Call Now (877) 223-7784





             


             

             

            We appreciate everyone who attended the 2023 Pioneer Water Tanks America Conference. Every company within our network is an important part of Building the Future providing top-tier water storage solutions.

            Water professionals from Arizona, California, Hawaii, Texas, Australia, and more joined us at the Wimberley Community Center.

            Our network of water professionals experienced presentations from Bartlett, Ahrens, MSDC, LLC, and many more covering essential topics.

            Pioneer Water Tanks America Warehouse Update
            Pioneer Water Tanks America Warehouse Update

            Pioneer Water Tanks America added 16,000 SF of space to our existing warehouse. Our team has done a great job at organizing the space and preparing for our next phase of growth.

             

            Pioneer Water Tanks Worldwide Reach
            Pioneer Water Tanks Worldwide Reach

             

            Ahrens Water Group General Manager Alistair Johnston came with resources and updates that include Pioneer Water Tanks America. We have the expertise to successfully deliver projects in any location – from complex inner-city footprints to remote outback regions.

            The Pioneer Dealer Awards were held at Roughhouse Brewing. The brewery is 13 minutes from the Wimberley Community Center and offers great food and a wide selection of beer and wine. Everyone thoroughly enjoyed the food and great company!
            https://www.roughhousebrewing.com/

            Harvested Rain Solutions is awarded Best Business Branding
            Harvested Rain Solutions is awarded Best Business Branding

            Top Texas Dealer, Harvest Rain
            https://harvestrain.com/

            Top California Dealer/Installer, WaterMark H2O
            https://watermarkh2o.com/

            Top International Dealer, APROMSA
            https://apromsa.com/

            Top Hawaii Dealer, Pacific Blue Catchment
            https://www.pacificbluecatchment.org/

            Top Sales Other Regions, NC Tanks

            Top Sales Growth, RainBear LLC
            https://www.rainbear.com/

            Top New Dealer, Fire Tank Pros
            https://www.firetankpros.com/

            Best Business Branding, Harvested Rain Solutions
            https://harvestedrainsolutions.com/

            Customer Service Award, Tanks Alot
            http://www.tanksalottx.com/

            Installation Excellence Award Texas Tank Solutions – CA Martin and Chase Eliff
            https://www.texastanksolutions.com/


            Valued Sponsors


            ARGCO Fire Department Connections include:
            FDC Projecting Siamese Inlets, FDCS With City Threads, FDC Single Outlet Connections, FDC Free Standing Inlets, FDC Roof Manifolds, FDC Flush Inlets, FDC Swivel Gaskets
            https://argco.com/fire-equipment/fire-department-connections.html


            Rainwater Equipment Featuring DAB Pumps

            When Rainwater Equipment (RWE) and DAB Pumps began working together in 2019, neither knew what to expect from the other, but almost 5 years later, it’s evident that the success of their partnership has exceeded expectations.

            Jim and Mitzi Wood, owner/operators of Rainwater Equipment first met with Paul Shuford (Sales Promotion & DTraining) from DAB at the RWE offices/warehouse in Willow Park, TX to discuss bringing on a new line of pumps as part of its rainwater solution for system installers. It was then that Jim & Mitzi discovered the potential impact that DAB pumps could have on their business. “A few of our installation customers had asked us if we were carrying DAB,” Jim says, “so we wanted to check them out. We’re always open to looking at new products that can solve water problems and make life easier.”

            Read the full article:
            https://rainwaterequipment.com/blog/rainwater-equipment-and-dab-pumps-a-working-partnership/


            VIQUA UV SYSTEMS

             


            Residential & Light Commercial UV Water Systems. With over 600,000 installations around the world, VIQUA is one of the most recognized and respected brands of residential and light commercial UV water systems.
            https://www.trojantechnologies.com/en/products/residential


            Bartlett Tank Liners


            Bartlett Tank Liners is a fully owned subsidiary of C.E Bartlett with over 35 years of experience in the development and manufacture of supported fabrics for the tank liner market and over 60 years in the industrial textiles industry. As the recognized market leader in providing water containment solutions, BTL prides itself on quality products backed by years of development and close working relationships with both its fabric supplier and the installers of the tank liners to ensure the end customer receives the best possible solution to their water storage needs.
            https://bartlett.net.au/bartlett-tank-liners/

             

             

            The Pioneer Water Tanks America team recently completed a project for a commercial facility in Guayama, Puerto Rico. Richard Dunfield completed the sale, and Ben Pedraza led the onsite supervised installation with a local crew.

             

            XLE 60/03 Model of Pioneer Water Tank
            XLE 60/03 Model of Pioneer Water Tank

             

            The XLE 60/03 model of Pioneer Water Tank stores wastewater within an Industratex liner. The Pioneer Water Tank is upgraded in Surfmist® COLORBOND steel to further safeguard against the harsh island environment.

             

            Pioneer Water Tank in Surfmist® COLORBOND Steel
            Pioneer Water Tank in Surfmist® COLORBOND Steel

             

            Pioneer Water Tanks Industratex® commercial tank liner storage capabilities for non-aggressive and aggressive water types. The Industratex® is certified under NSF/ANSI Standard 61 Drinking Water, Certificate 3A240-02. The Industratex® is UV Resistant, flex resistant, abrasion resistant, tear and tensile strength, and chemical resistant for commercial and industrial applications.

            Learn more at   https://pioneerwatertanksamerica.com/industratex-pioneer-water-tanks-liner/

             

            The location of the project is in rural Puerto Rico. The location of the Pioneer warehouse allowed for efficient delivery and installation timeframe.

            The installation is complete and ready to hold wastewater. Pioneer Water Tanks America continues to equip Puerto Rico and the Caribbean with water storage solutions for expanding applications.

             

             

            Is it illegal to collect rainwater in your state?

             

            Is rainwater harvesting illegal in America?

            There are seven states with legal restrictions on rainwater harvesting but it is still allowed everywhere in America. Each state regulates rainwater harvesting with additional local regulations found in some areas. It’s important to understand the regulations on rainwater harvesting by the authority with jurisdiction before utilizing this sustainable water source.

             

            What are the seven states with restrictions or water rights requirements for rainwater harvesting?

            1. Arkansas: Rainwater harvesting systems are allowed for non-potable purposes only if they are designed by a professional engineer licensed in Arkansas, designed with appropriate cross-connection safeguards, and comply with the Arkansas Plumbing Code.

            2. Colorado: Colorado residents are legally allowed to store up to 150-gallons from rainwater harvesting systems without a water rights permit, as long as the system complies with the Colorado Water Conservation Board.

            3. Kansas: It’s not illegal to harvest rainwater in Kansas but you may need to apply for a permit to do so if you plan on using the water for anything other than for domestic purposes.

            4. Nevada: There are restrictions on using rainwater for anything other than for wildlife but SB74 created a few changes including allowing the use of a small-scale rainwater system without having to prove the “use it or lose it” doctrine and expanding the use for the water.

            5. Oregon: While rainwater harvesting is allowed in Oregon, there are a lot of statutes regulating it including specifying only rooftop collection.

            6. Utah: Utah allows for rainwater harvesting on land owned or leased by the person responsible for the collection. Must register system with Utah Division of Water Rights

            7. Washington: Washington allows rooftop rainwater harvesting for domestic use without a water permit, other applications may require a permit.

             

            One common Uniform Plumbing Code that is often cited by states is Chapter 13 Nonpotable Water Systems, Section 1303 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection, and Distribution Systems.

            SECTION 1303 NON-POTABLE RAINWATER COLLECTION AND DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

            1303.1 General. The provisions of Section 1303 shall govern the construction, installation, alteration, and repair of rainwater collection and conveyance systems for the collection, storage, treatment, and distribution of rainwater for non-potable applications, as permitted by the jurisdiction.

            1303.2 Collection surface. Rainwater shall be collected only from above-ground impervious roofing surfaces constructed from approved materials. Collection of water from vehicular parking or pedestrian surfaces shall be prohibited except where the water is used exclusively for landscape irrigation. Overflow and bleed-off pipes from roof-mounted appliances including but not limited to evaporative coolers, water heaters, and solar water heaters shall not discharge onto rainwater collection surfaces.

             

            The map below shows the seven states with restricted legality on rainwater harvesting and the rest that have fully legalized systems without filing for a water rights permit. Is your state one of them?

            Is rainwater harvesting illegal

             

            Alabama

            The state of Alabama recognizes rainwater harvesting as a private property right. Water rights in Alabama fall under the riparian doctrine. The Alabama Water Resources Act regulates water rights and gives authority to the Alabama Water Resources Commission. The Commission has released policy recommendations including rainwater harvesting as a water conservation solution.

            Pioneer Water Tanks exceed all requirements for water storage applications for the Alabama Department of Environmental Management.

            • The Alabama Cooperative Extension System has an online resource, Rainwater Harvesting in Alabama.

            (Link)

            • Alabama Water Resources Act, Chapter 10B – Alabama Water Resources

            (Link)

            • Rainwater Harvesting for Irrigation Water by Alabama A&M Auburn University

            (Link)

            Alaska

            Rainwater Harvesting isn’t illegal in Alaska and is used as a primary source of water for many inhabitants. Groundwater harvesting is heavily regulated but can be purchased as a water right with the State of Alaska. Water is a public resource managed by the State to maximize the benefit to the public. Alaskans have the right to collect rainwater and snow, as well as self-haul from natural water sources (within the legal confines). (Link) Learn more about rainwater harvesting in Alaska:

            • Alaska Department of Natural Resources, Water Rights In Alaska

            (Link)

            • “In Alaska’s Constitution, water was declared a public resource belonging to the people of the state to be managed by the state for maximum benefit to the public. All surface and subsurface waters on all lands in Alaska are reserved to the people for common use and are subject to appropriation in accordance with the Alaska Water Use Act. The Water Resources Section adjudicates water rights, provides technical hydrologic support, and assures dam safety.”

            (Link)

            • Rainwater Harvesting in Cold Climates

            “With freshly fallen snow 10 inches of snow will equal approximately 0.7 inches of water or another way to calculate it is 14 inches of freshly fallen snow will equal 1 inch of water. Over time the snow becomes more compacted and by the time the snow begins to melt it will yield more water per inch; closer to 3-4 inches of snow will equal 1 inch of water.”

            (Link)

            Arizona

            It’s legal in Arizona to use rainwater harvesting for non-potable, outdoor use. Many counties in Arizona have a Plumbing Code that refers to Section P2912 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems of the International Residential Code for regulation. Rainwater harvesting is legal for non-potable applications without a permit, with some counties having regulations on potable use (for example Coconino County).

            Many cities offer financial incentives for rainwater harvesting (for example, Tucson). These incentives were established by Arizona House Bill 2830 (2012) allows the governing body of a city or town to establish an energy and water savings account that consists of a designated pool of capital investment monies to fund energy or water savings projects in public facilities, including rainwater harvesting systems (Arizona Revised Statutes §9-499.16).

            Watershed Management Group is a nonprofit organization that offers public education, resources, classes, and more to promote sustainable practices like rainwater harvesting.

            (WaterShedMG.org)

            • There are a growing number of tax incentives and rebates in Arizona:

            http://www.tucsonaz.gov/water/rebate

            • A User’s Guide to Section P2914 of the 2018 International Residential Code: Potable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems, Coconino County, Arizona

            (Link)

            • “The waters of all sources, flowing in streams, canyons, ravines or other natural channels, or indefinite underground channels, whether perennial or intermittent, flood, waste or surplus water, and of lakes, ponds and springs on the surface, belong to the public and are subject to appropriation and beneficial use…..”, (Arizona Revised Statutes § 45-141).

            (Link)

            • Arizona Department of Water Resources: Water Harvesting resources and links

            (Link)

            • City of Tucson Water: Harvesting Rainwater Guide to Water-Efficient Landscaping

            (Link)

             

            • Tucson’s Commercial Rainwater Harvesting Ordinance Section 4-01.0.0

            “[Rainwater] Harvesting is a useful strategy for providing supplemental irrigation water to commercial landscapes, making more efficient use of the desert’s most limited resource – water. The City of Tucson Mayor and Council adopted the Commercial Harvesting Ordinance on October 14, 2008, to increase the use of harvested at commercial in Tucson and to decrease the use of potable and reclaimed water supplies. The ordinance takes effect on June 1, 2010.”

            https://codelibrary.amlegal.com/codes/tucson/latest/tucson_az_udc/0-0-0-10610

            https://www.tucsonaz.gov/files/water/docs/rainwaterord.pdf

            https://www.tucsonaz.gov/water/ordinances

            Arkansas

            The State of Arkansas allows rainwater harvesting for non-potable use without a permit. Rainwater isn’t currently allowed as a potable drinking water source.

            Code Annotated § 17-38-201 (2014) declares that the State Board of Health “shall allow the use of a harvested rainwater system used for a non-potable purpose if the harvested rainwater system is: (1) designed by a professional engineer licensed in Arkansas; (2) is designed with appropriate cross-connection safeguards; and (3) complies with Arkansas Plumbing Code.”

            (Link)

            Pioneer Water Tanks exceed all requirements for water storage applications for the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality.

            • The Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government has another resource that has a chapter on rainwater systems.

            (Link)

             

            California

            The State of California enacted the Rainwater Capture Act in 2012. The Act authorizes residential, commercial, and governmental landowners to install, maintain, and operate rainwater harvesting systems that comply with specified requirements.

            Rooftop rainwater harvesting doesn’t require a water rights permit in California. In 2018, the State of California SB-558 Property taxation: new construction exclusion: rainwater capture system was enacted. This act updated Section 74.8 of the California Revenue and Taxation Code to exclude new construction of rainwater harvesting systems for property evaluation for taxes, as a financial incentive. The California Plumbing Code 2016 covers Chapter 16 Nonpotable Rainwater Catchment Systems requirements that are followed per County. There aren’t any regulations currently for rainwater harvesting as a potable drinking water source in California.

            The State of California recognizes rainwater harvesting as water conservation and sustainability. Systems can be a water source for:

            – Irrigation

            – Non-potable uses (even indoor like toilet flushing, laundry, etc)

            – Fire protection systems including sprinklers, fire department connections, etc.

            – Back-up water supply

            • State of California AB-1750 Rainwater Capture Act of 2012

            (Link)

            • State of California SB-558 Property taxation: new construction exclusion: Rain Water Capture System  (2017-2018)

            (Link)

            • State Of California State Board Of Equalization Property Tax Department: New Construction Exclusion: Rain Water Capture System

            (Link)

            • California Plumbing Code 2016, Chapter 16 Nonpotable Rainwater Catchment Systems, 1602.0 Nonpotable Rainwater Catchment Systems

            1602.1 General

            The installation, construction, alteration, and repair of rainwater catchments systems intended to supply uses such as water closets, urinals, trap primers for floor drains and floor sinks, irrigation, industrial processes, water features, cooling tower makeup, and other uses shall be approved by the Authority Having Jurisdiction. Additional design criteria are capable of being found in ARCSA/ASPE 63.

            (Link)

            • California Senate Bill No. 558, or as it was first known as Prop 72, passed and was approved by the Governor on January 31, 2018. This act added and repealed Section 74.8 of the California Revenue and Taxation Code to exclude property taxes from the new construction of rainwater harvesting systems.

            (Link)

            Colorado

            Colorado House Bill 16-1005 enacted in 2016 allows for the collection of precipitation from a residential rooftop if:
            – Two or fewer rain barrels are used with a combined storage capacity limited to 110-gallons or less
            – The building being used for collection is primarily a single-family dwelling or a residence with four or fewer units
            – The collected precipitation must be used on the property where it was collected for outdoor purposes only

            (Link)

            • “Colorado residents should understand that water rights in Colorado are unique compared to other parts of the country. The use of water in this state and other western states is governed by what is known as the prior appropriation doctrine… A simplified way to explain this system is often referred to as the priority system or “first in time, first in right.” It may seem strange that rainwater harvesting in Colorado is so carefully watched, but understanding why this is so can provide valuable insight into the way water is shared in Colorado.” – from the Colorado State University

            (Link)

            • Colorado Division of Water Resources: Rainwater Collection in Colorado
            Senate Bill 09-080, which was passed by the General Assembly and signed by the Governor during the 2009 legislative session, will allow certain property owners who rely on certain types of wells for their water supply, limited collection and use of precipitation, only if:

            1. The property on which the collection takes place is residential property; and

            2. The landowner uses a well, or is legally entitled to a well, for the water supply; and

            3. The well is permitted for domestic uses according to Section 37-92-602, C.R.S., or Section 37-90-105, C.R.S. (generally, this means the permit number will be five or six digits with no “-F” suffix at the end); and

            4. There is no water supply available in the area from a municipality or water district; and

            5. The rainwater is collected only from the roof of a building that is used primarily as a residence; and

            6. The water is used only for those uses that are allowed by, and identified on, the well Permit.

            (Link)

            • Colorado State University, Rainwater Collection in Colorado:

            (Link)

            Connecticut

            Connecticut’s official watershed plan for stormwater management includes rainwater harvesting without a water rights permit. The 2018 Connecticut State Building Code refers to 2015 IPC Section 1303 Non-potable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems for regulations. View the 2015 IPC portion of the 2018 CT State Building Code, Section 1303 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems (link).

            Pioneer Water Tanks exceed all requirements for water storage applications for the Connecticut Water Planning Council.

            2015 IPC portion of the 2018 CT State Building Code, Section 1303 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems

            1303.1 General

            The provisions of Section 1303 shall govern the construction, installation, alteration and repair of rainwater collection and conveyance systems for the collection, storage, treatment and distribution of rainwater for nonpotable applications, as permitted by the jurisdiction.

            (Link)

            • Connecticut government website short guide to rainwater harvesting, “Rainfall as a Resource A Resident’s Guide to Rain Barrels in Connecticut”

            (Link)

            • Rainwater harvesting is a part of Connecticut’s watershed plan as a way of stormwater management:

            (Link)

            Delaware

            Rainwater harvesting is recognized as sustainable stormwater management and doesn’t require a water rights permit in Delaware. The 2018 State of Delaware Plumbing Code refers to the 2015 IPC Section 1303 Non-potable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems for regulations.

            Rainwater harvesting systems are eligible for Delaware Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund that provides loans for green infrastructure projects. The University of Delaware has released resources on rainwater harvesting, including a complete guide.

            2018 State of Delaware Plumbing Code: Section 1303 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems

            1303.1 General

            The provisions of Section 1303 shall govern the construction, installation, alteration, and repair of rainwater collection and conveyance systems for the collection, storage, treatment, and distribution of rainwater for non-potable applications, as permitted by the jurisdiction.

            (Link)

            University of Delaware guide to rainwater harvesting:

            (Link)

            Green Infrastructure Primer A Delaware Guide to Using Natural Systems in Urban, Rural, and Coastal Settings

            (Link)

            Florida

            It’s legal in Florida to utilize rainwater harvesting and systems may be eligible for state or local funding. Florida Building Code refers to International Green Construction Code P2912 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems addressing the construction, installation, alteration, and repair of rainwater collection systems. Rainwater harvesting doesn’t require a water rights permit and may be eligible for funding as sustainable water management.

            Rainwater harvesting systems are becoming a more viable water source in Florida for both businesses and residents.

            Rainwater harvesting is encouraged in Florida with tax incentives and rebates being offered by several local municipalities. Pioneer Water Tanks exceed all requirements for water storage applications for the Florida Department of Water Resource Management.

            FLORIDA BUILDING CODE – Residential 6TH Edition (2017)

            P2912 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems: New section addressing the construction, installation, alteration and repair of rainwater collection and conveyance systems. Provisions are based on the International Green Construction Code.

            (Link)

            • Augmenting Rainwater Harvesting to Offset Potable Water for Irrigation and Indoor Use within the Tampa Bay Region A Best Management Practice

            (Link)

            Georgia

            The State of Georgia allows rainwater harvesting without a water rights permit and encourages water conservation. Georgia State Minimum Standard Plumbing Code 2012 (IPC 2012) Chapter 15 Rain Water Harvesting Systems sets regulations for non-potable use, including for indoors. The provisions outlined in the Chapter govern the materials, design, construction, and installation of rainwater harvesting systems.

            “Nothing in this Chapter shall be construed to restrict the use of rainwater for outdoor irrigation.” – Georgia State Minimum Standard Plumbing Code 2012 (IPC 2012) Chapter 15 Rain Water Harvesting Systems

            Rainwater harvesting is legal in Georgia and is regulated by the Department of Natural Resources in the Environmental Protection Division. Pioneer Water Tanks exceed all requirements for water storage applications for the Georgia Water Council.

            • Georgia Rainwater Harvesting Guidelines

            The Georgia Rainwater Harvesting Guidelines are intended to assist all parties involved in the design, construction, inspection, and maintenance of rainwater harvesting systems and to help successfully comply with Appendix I-‘Rainwater Recycling Systems’ of the 2009 Georgia Amendments to the 2006 International Plumbing Code (IPC). The parties mentioned above include owners, building officials, design professionals, and contractors.

            (Link)

            • Georgia State Minimum Standard Plumbing Code 2012 (IPC 2012) Chapter 15 Rain Water Harvesting Systems

            1501.1 Scope.

            The provisions of this Chapter shall govern the materials, design, construction, and installation of rainwater systems for automatic clothes washers, flushing of water closets, flushing of urinals, and cooling tower makeup water. Nothing in this Chapter shall be construed to restrict the use of rainwater for outdoor irrigation.

            1501.3 Definition

            The following terms shall have the meaning shown herein.

            CONDENSATE. Condensed water collected from the surfaces of an air conditioning unit’s evaporator coils or a dehumidifier unit’s evaporator coils.

            RAINWATER. Water collected from runoff of roofs or other structures after a rain event. Rainwater may also include condensate.

            (Link)

            • University of Georgia Rainwater Harvesting for System Designers and Contractors

            (Link)

            Hawaii

            Rainwater harvesting isn’t illegal in Hawaii and is regulated by Regulated through the Department of Health and Safety. Rainwater harvesting provides a water source for many Hawaii residents and businesses. Hawaii County Plumbing Code 1601.3 Permit or Approval covers rainwater systems not requiring a permit unless used for indoor or drinking water use or having a capacity over 360-gallons. Senate Concurrent Resolution 172 (2008) encouraged county water boards to study and promote water conservation through rainwater collection. (Link)

            According to this resolution, there has been a long history of rainwater collection in the state but primarily in more rural areas in the past. Pioneer Water Tanks exceed all requirements for water storage applications for the Hawaii Department of Health and Safety.

            • Hawaii County Plumbing Code

            1601.3 Permit or Approval. It shall be unlawful for any person to construct, install, alter, or cause to be constructed, installed, or altered any alternate water source system in a building or on-premises without first obtaining a permit or approval to do such work from the Authority Having Jurisdiction.

            Exceptions:

            (1) A permit is not required for exterior rainwater catchment systems used for outdoor drip and subsurface irrigation with a maximum storage capacity of 360 gallons (1363 L).

            (2) A plumbing permit is not required for rainwater catchment systems for single-family dwellings where outlets, piping, and system components are located on the exterior of the building. This does not exempt the need for permits where required for electrical connections, tank supports, or Enclosures.”

            (Link)

            • Guidelines on Rainwater Catchment Systems for Hawaii

            (Link)

            • University of Hawaii rainwater harvesting resources

            (Link)

            Idaho

            Rainwater harvesting is legal in Idaho and there aren’t any regulations currently legislating it for the state.

            The Idaho Constitution states, “the right to divert and appropriate the unappropriated waters of any natural stream to beneficial uses, shall never be denied…”

            Article 15, 3. In 2008, the Office of the Idaho Attorney General further clarified this by stating, “Your letter of August 1, 2008, asked for a clarification of Idaho law concerning the capture and collection of rainwater. Generally, a person in Idaho has the right to collect diffused surface waters, which include rainwater, on his or her property so long as it does not cause injury to the existing water rights of others.” (Link)

            Pioneer Water Tanks exceed all requirements for water storage applications for the Idaho Water Resource Board.

            • The University of Idaho released a pamphlet about rainwater harvesting in Idaho:

            (Link)

            • “the right to divert and appropriate the unappropriated waters of any natural stream to beneficial uses shall never be denied…” Idaho Constitution, Article 15, 3.

            (Link)

            Illinois

            It’s legal to harvest rainwater in Illinois. Rainwater harvesting needs a permit for systems with more than 5,000-gallons of capacity, when at-risk populations are potentially impacted, or if the system application includes subsurface irrigation, non-aerosolized surface applications that comply with Section 890.3050. Illinois Plumbing Code Section 890.3000 On-Site Collected Rainwater and Stormwater regulates rainwater harvesting systems, under CSA B805-2876 17/International Code Council 805-2017. There are currently two Illinois state statutes:

            • In 2009, Illinois created the Green Infrastructure for Clean Water Act which relates to water conservation, efficiency, infrastructure, and management while promoting rainwater harvesting (Illinois Revised Statutes Chapter 415 §56).

            • House Bill 991 (2011) amended the Homeowners’ Solar Rights Act. It requires that within 120 days after a homeowners’ association, common interest community association, or condominium unit owners’ association receives a request for a policy statement or an application from an association member, the association shall adopt an energy policy statement regarding (i) the location, design, and architectural requirements of solar energy systems; and (ii) whether a wind energy collection, rainwater collection, or composting system is allowed, and, if so, the location, design, and architectural requirements of those systems (Illinois Revised Statutes Chapter 765 § 165/20).

            • IL SB0038 | 2011-2012 | 97th General Assembly | Introduced

            Bill Title: Amends the Illinois Plumbing License Law. Provides that “plumbing” includes rainwater harvesting distribution systems, but does not include any rainwater harvesting distribution system or rainwater harvesting collection system unless otherwise required by the Illinois Plumbing Code. Requires the Illinois Department of Public Health to adopt and publish a minimum code of standards for rainwater harvesting collection systems and rainwater harvesting distribution systems by January 1, 2012.

            Requires rainwater harvesting collection systems and rainwater harvesting distribution systems to be (A) used only for non-potable uses and (B) constructed in accordance with the Illinois Plumbing Code. Defines “rainwater harvesting collection system” and “rainwater harvesting distribution system”. Effective immediately.

            (Link)

            Pioneer Water Tanks exceed all requirements for water storage applications for the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency.

            Indiana

            It’s legal to harvest rainwater harvest in Indiana. The state government of Indiana has a page about it: here. Pioneer Water Tanks exceed all requirements for water storage applications for the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, the Water Division. Get a quote today to start safely storing water.

            “Green Infrastructure: Reroute rooftop drainage pipes from draining rainwater into the storm sewer to draining it into rainwater harvesting systems, cisterns, or permeable areas.”
            “Harvest and reuse rainwater whenever possible,” Indiana Department of Environmental Management Office of Program Support Pollution Prevention and Technical Assistance Section Compliance and Technical Assistance Program

            (Link)

            State of Indiana government website on rain barrels:

            (Link)

            Iowa

            It is legal to harvest rainwater in Iowa, there aren’t any current state statutes. The State of Iowa encourages rainwater harvesting with the Iowa Rain Campaign, for water conservation and stormwater management. The 1985 Iowa Water Plan defines water as “public waters and public wealth of Iowa citizens.” Currently, rainwater harvesting may fall under the topic of water reuse for the Iowa Plumbing Code for larger capacities.

            • The Iowa Stormwater Partnership has a resource about rainwater harvesting.

            (Link)

            • Iowa Rain Campaign

            (Link)

            • Iowa rain rebates:

            (Link)

            “First in time, first in right” Further appropriation ONLY if water is physically available

            IOWA uses…. A combination of these is best described as “modified riparian”. This focuses on the preservation of instream water uses. The concept originated in South Carolina and Mississippi. However, Iowa is the first state to extensively implement it.

            Beneficial use The purpose of the law, adopted in 1957, is to “…assure that water resources be put to beneficial use to the fullest extent possible, that waste or unreasonable use of water be prevented, and that conservation be required”.

            Use, not owning the right of a riparian owner to prohibit the use of the water by non-riparian neighbors is established; this right by no means makes the water in the stream his property. The water is considered a “wealth” of the people of the State. That is actually an old Roman Law concept.
            All waters are “public waters and public wealth” of Iowa citizens. Iowa statute provides an allocation system based on “beneficial use”.

            • Waste, unreasonable use and unreasonable methods of water use are prevented.

            • Water conservation is expected

            • Permit System

            – Withdrawals in excess of 25,000 gallons/day from streams or aquifers require a permit from IDNR.

            (Link)

            Kansas

            It’s not illegal to harvest rainwater in Kansas but you may need to apply for a permit to do so if you plan on using the water for anything other than for domestic purposes. The Kansas Water Appropriation Act protects both the people’s right to use Kansas water and the state’s supplies of groundwater and surface water for the future.

            The law is administered by the Kansas Department of Agriculture’s Division of Water Resources, which issues permits to appropriate water, regulates usage, and keeps records of all water rights in the state. It is illegal for individuals in Kansas to use water without holding a vested right or applying for, and receiving a permit to appropriate water from the Division of Water Resources. The exception is water used solely for domestic purposes – that is, water-primarily used for the household, watering livestock on pasture, or watering up to two acres of lawn and gardens. No permit is needed for that class of water usage.”

            The Kansas Department of Agriculture

            • The State includes regulation with the Plumbing Code 2018 of Kansas, Chapter 13 Non-potable Water Systems: Section 1303 Non-potable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems. The provisions of Section 1303 regulate rainwater harvesting construction, installation, alteration, repair based on the Uniform Plumbing Code.

            Rainwater systems for outdoor domestic purposes (irrigation, livestock, wildlife, watering, etc), do not require a water rights permit. Rainwater is not specified as a source for drinking, potable water in Kansas. Rainwater systems are included in the Kansas Water Office Future Water Supply Plan as a statewide action.

            • Plumbing Code 2018 of Kansas

            Chapter 13 Nonpotable Water Systems: Section 1303 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems

            1303.1 General

            The provisions of Section 1303 shall govern the construction, installation, alteration, and repair of rainwater collection and conveyance systems for the collection, storage, treatment, and distribution of rainwater for nonpotable applications, as permitted by the jurisdiction.

            (Link)

            • Kansas Water Appropriation Act

            (Link)

            • A Long-Term Vision for the Future of Water Supply in Kansas by the Kansas Water Office

            STATEWIDE ACTION ITEMS

            Within municipal systems, develop methods to use locally collected stormwater and increase adoption of on-site or individual stormwater collection through activities such as rain barrels and rain gardens

            5. Increase collection of agricultural on-site rainwater collection

            (Link)

            Kentucky

            It’s legal to utilize rainwater harvesting in Kentucky under 151.120 Public Water of the Commonwealth. “(2) Diffused surface water which flows vagrantly over the surface of the ground shall not be regarded as public water, and the owner of the land on which such water falls or flows shall have the right to its use.”

            There aren’t any current codes that cover rainwater systems. The Agricultural Water Act includes rainwater harvesting as a water source for agricultural and livestock purposes. Rainwater is utilized on Kentucky farms for a wide spectrum of domestic applications.

            • 151.120 Public Water of Commonwealth, What Constitutes

            (1) Water occurring in any stream, lake, groundwater, subterranean water, or other body of water in the Commonwealth which may be applied to any useful and beneficial purpose is hereby declared to be a natural resource and public water of the Commonwealth and subject to control or regulation for the public welfare as provided in KRS Chapters 146, 149, 151, 262 and 350.029 and 433.750 to 433.757.

            (2) Diffused surface water that flows vagrantly over the surface of the ground shall not be regarded as public water, and the owner of the land on which such water falls or flows shall have the right to its use. Water left standing in natural pools in a natural stream when the natural flow of the stream has ceased, shall not be regarded as public water and the owners of land contiguous to that water shall have the rights to its use.

            (Link)

            • Kentucky rainwater harvesting resource sheet with more links

            (Link)

            Louisiana

            Louisiana does not prohibit rainwater harvesting but there are city-wide statutes against water cisterns, dating back to hundred years ago when yellow fever was around. The current statute for New Orleans is:

            Sec. 82-55. – Covers required for cisterns. All cisterns, the water of which is used for drinking or culinary purposes, shall be provided by the owners thereof with suitable covers. (Code 1956, § 59-3)

            Several nonprofit organizations encourage rainwater harvesting, such as WaterWise Gulf South and Greenlight New Orleans Rain Barrel Program.

            • City of New Orleans, Louisiana Code 1956, § 59-3

            (Link)

            • WaterWise Gulf South includes rainwater harvesting resource for NOLA

            Water Wise NOLA—Dana Brown & Associates Landscape Architects, Global Green, and Recharge NOLA—is an environmental outreach collaborative devoted to advancing and promoting green infrastructure and its associated benefits through education, events, tours, do-it-yourself workshops, demonstration projects, and leadership training.

            (Link)

            • Greenlight New Orleans Rain Barrel Program

            (Link)

            • STORMWATER Best Management Practices East Baton Rouge Parish – Master Development Program

            A cistern, which captures rooftop runoff, serves several stormwater functions. It retains the runoff until it can be used. Also, sediments in the water settle to the bottom of the cistern. Finally, if the cistern water is connected to a pump and is used for site irrigation, it recycles the rainwater and allows it to eventually infiltrate into the ground.

            (Link)

            Maine

            It’s not illegal to harvest rainwater in Maine. The State of Maine Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual has a chapter on Low Impact Development Practices that includes rainwater harvesting. The City of Portland also cites rainwater for sustainable development.

            There isn’t any mention of rainwater harvesting in the Maine State Internal Plumbing Code currently.

            • City of Portland, Maine Clean Water Equals Clean Growth

            (Link)

            State of Maine Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual: Chapter on Low Impact Development Practices

            Collection Cisterns: In a commercial setting, the collection of rain runoff can be put to use in the building to offset the cost of their water supply. Cisterns can be located either above or below ground and in out-of-the-way places that can easily be incorporated into a site design. Commercially available systems are typically constructed of high-density plastics and can include pumps and filtration devices. Rain barrels are inexpensive, effective, and easily maintainable when used in residential applications to capture roof runoff for later watering of lawns and gardens. Rain Collection Cisterns: Rainwater is stored for later reuse for the building or landscapes.

            (Link)

            Maryland

            It’s not illegal to harvest rainwater in Maryland. Rainwater systems are regulated under the Plumbing Code 2018 of Maryland, Chapter 13 Nonpotable Water Systems: Section 1303 Non-Potable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems. The Maryland Stormwater Design Manual and other local City guidelines include rainwater harvesting for sustainable stormwater management.

            There are municipalities in Maryland that offer rebates or financial incentives to enact rainwater harvesting for water conservation.

            • Maryland Stormwater Design Manual, Volumes I and II (October 2000, Revised May 2009)

            (Link)

            • Rainwater Collection Rebates The City of Gaithersburg

            (Link)

            • Maryland Department of the Environment Stormwater Design Guidance – Rainwater Harvesting

            (Link)

            • Plumbing Code 2018 of Maryland

            Section 1303 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems

            1303.1 General

            The provisions of Section 1303 shall govern the construction, installation, alteration, and repair of rainwater collection and conveyance systems for the collection, storage, treatment, and distribution of rainwater for nonpotable applications, as permitted by the jurisdiction.

            (Link)

            Massachusetts

            It’s legal to utilize rainwater harvesting for outdoor, domestic purposes in Massachusetts. The Massachusetts State Government offers an online resource on Rain Barrels and Other Water Conservation Tools. Massachusetts doesn’t currently have legislation to govern rainwater harvesting but it is included in water conservation, stormwater management resources.

            • Massachusetts State Government: Rain Barrels and Other Water Conservation Tools

            (Link)

            • WATER CONSERVATION STANDARDS The Commonwealth of Massachusetts EXECUTIVE OFFICE of ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS and WATER RESOURCES COMMISSION July 2006

            (Link)

            • Stormwater Best Management Practices: Guidance Document by Boston Water and Sewer Commission

            (Link)

            Michigan

            It’s not illegal to harvest rainwater in Michigan. The State of Michigan encourages rainwater harvesting for water conservation with Act 625 of 2012. The 2015 Michigan Plumbing Code Section A1303 Non-potable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems, sets regulations for rainwater harvesting systems.

            There are many statewide and local municipal resources that include rainwater harvesting practices for low-impact development.

            • 2015 Michigan Plumbing Code, Section A1303 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems

            A1303.1 General The provisions of Section A1303 shall govern the construction, installation, alteration, and repair of rainwater collection and conveyance systems for the collection, storage, treatment, and distribution of rainwater for nonpotable applications, as permitted by the jurisdiction.

            (Link)

            • City of Detroit Drainage Program Guide Green Stormwater Infrastructure (GSI) Best Management Practice: Cisterns, includes financial incentives for rainwater harvesting

            (Link)

            • Low Impact Development Manual for Michigan: includes rainwater harvesting recommendations and case studies in the local area

            (Link)

            Minnesota

            It’s not illegal to harvest rainwater in Minnesota. The State of Minnesota encourages safe use of rainwater:

            (Link)

            Minnesota allows rainwater harvesting from rooftop collection for outdoor, domestic uses. The 2015 Minnesota Plumbing Code, Chapter 4714.1702 Non-Potable Rainwater Catchment Systems regulates the installation, construction, alteration, and repairs.

            Rainwater can only be legally collected from building rooftops in Minnesota and may not be collected from parking lots, surface runoff, stagnant water, or similar non-roof surfaces.

            1702.9.3 Collection Surfaces. Rainwater catchment systems shall collect rainwater only from roof surfaces. Rainwater catchment systems shall not collect rainwater from:

            (1) vehicular parking surfaces;

            (2) surface water runoff;

            (3) bodies of standing water; or

            (4) similar non-roof surfaces.

            • The Minnesota Stormwater Manual has a chapter on Stormwater and rainwater harvest and use/reuse.

            (Link)

            • Minnesota Administrative Rules 4714.1702 NONPOTABLE RAINWATER CATCHMENT SYSTEMS. 1702.1 General.

            The installation, construction, alteration, and repair of rainwater catchment systems intended to supply uses such as water closets, urinals, trap primers for floor drains and floor sinks, industrial processes, water features, vehicle washing facilities, cooling tower makeup, and similar uses shall be approved by the commissioner.

            (Link)

            Minn. R. 4714.1702-6

            1702.9.3 Collection Surfaces. Rainwater catchment systems shall collect rainwater only from roof surfaces. Rainwater catchment systems shall not collect rainwater from:

            (1) vehicular parking surfaces;

            (2) surface water runoff;

            (3) bodies of standing water; or

            (4) similar nonroof surfaces.

            1702.9.3.1 Prohibited Discharges. Overflows and bleed-off pipes from roof-mounted equipment and appliances, condensate, and other waste disposals shall not discharge onto roof surfaces that collect rainwater for rainwater catchment systems.

            (Link)

            Mississippi

            It’s legal to utilize rainwater harvesting systems as a water source for domestic (non-potable) and can be permitted as a potable, drinking water source. The Mississippi Department of Health “Director or Administrator determines that alternative water achieve the equivalent level of public health protection” when utilized for a potable drinking water source.

            • Mississippi State University provides many online resources on different applications of rainwater harvesting.

            (Link)

            • Mississippi Handbook for Stormwater Management: Rain Barrels and Cisterns (2-9, 4-53)
            “Cisterns, or rain barrels, are a method of collecting and storing rainwater for future use. Uses include irrigation, vehicle washing, toilet flushing, and laundry operation. Cisterns are effective for reducing runoff if they are used correctly.”

            (Link)

            • Mississippi Department of Health Part 20: Bureau of Public Water Supply
            Subpart 72: Public Water Supply

            10. Public water system means a system for the provision to the public of water for human consumption through pipes or, after August 5, 1998, other constructed conveyances, if such system has at least fifteen service connections or regularly serves an average of at least twenty-five individuals daily at least 60 days out of the year.

            Furthermore, two or more water systems that are adjacent, that are owned or operated by the same supplier of water, that individually serve less than 15 service connections or less than 25 persons but in combination serve 15 or more service connections or 25 or more persons, shall also be defined as a public water system. Such term includes: Any collection, treatment, storage, and distribution facilities under the control of the operator of such system and used primarily in connection with such system; and any collection or pretreatment storage facilities not under such control which are used primarily in connection with such system. Such a term does not include any “special irrigation district.” Service connection, as used in the definition of a public water system, does not include a connection to a system that delivers water by a constructed conveyance other than a pipe if:

            a. The water is used exclusively for purposes other than residential uses
            (consisting of drinking, bathing, cooking, or other similar uses);

            b. The Director or Administrator determines that alternative water to achieve the equivalent level of public health protection provided by the applicable national primary drinking water regulation is provided for residential or similar uses for drinking and cooking;

            (Link)

            • Bottling Rainwater: ‘An Elegant, Simple Solution To One Of The World’s Biggest Problems’: Richard’s Rainwater is operating with a Mississippi Brewery since Mississippi allows rainwater as a potable water source.

            (Link)

            Missouri

            It’s not illegal to harvest rainwater in Missouri. Missouri SB 782, Section 640.648 Landowner Use of Water, “Under this act, such landowners shall also have the right to have and use systems for potable water, and systems for rainwater collection.” Rainwater harvesting is legal for domestic and potable drinking water in Missouri.

            Certain municipalities include regulations on rainwater harvesting. The St. Louis Chapter plumbing code, chapter 25.04, Part three regulates Rainwater Catchment. The Southern Missouri Watershed group released a rainwater harvesting manual.

            (Link)

            • HCS/SS/SCS/SB 782 – This act modifies provisions relating to the Department of Natural Resources.

            LANDOWNER USE OF WATER (Section 640.648) – Currently, all Missouri landowners retain the right to have and use private water systems within city limits. Under this act, such landowners shall also have the right to have and use systems for potable water, and systems for rainwater collection.

            (Link)

            • St. Louis, Missouri Chapter 25.04 – PLUMBING CODE PART 3 – RAINWATER CATCHMENT SYSTEMS, PART 3 – RAINWATER CATCHMENT SYSTEMS

            1622.0 Non-Potable Rainwater Catchment Systems, Interior.

            1622.1 General. With the approval of the authority having jurisdiction, the provisions of this section shall apply to the installation, construction, alteration, and repair of rainwater catchments systems intended to supply uses such as water closets, urinals, trap primers for floor drains and floor sinks, and other uses approved by the authority having jurisdiction.

            (Link)

            Montana

            It’s not illegal to harvest rainwater in Montana. It’s legal in Montana to use rainwater harvesting systems as a water source for outdoor, domestic use. The Montana Plumbing Code cites the Uniform Plumbing Code, Section 1303 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems and lAPMO IS 6-2003 for installation requirements.

            • The Montana State University has an online resource, Rainwater Harvesting Systems for Montana.

            (Link)

            • Guide to Montana Water Management: Who Does What with Water Resources?

            “Water rights, which regulate water use, are singled out in Section Three of Article IX: “All existing rights to the use of any waters for any useful or beneficial purpose are hereby recognized and confirmed.” It clarifies that all uses of water, regardless the nature, are considered public uses” p. 10

            (Link)

            Nebraska

            It’s not illegal to harvest rainwater in Nebraska. Rainwater harvesting is encouraged for outdoor, domestic use. Rainwater use is regulated by the Residential Code 2018 of Nebraska: Chapter 29 Water Supply and Distribution, Section P2912 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems.

            The University of Nebraska offers online resources and case studies on rainwater harvesting.

            (Link)

            • University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Stormwater Management: Rainwater Harvesting with Rain Barrels

            (Link)

            • Residential Code 2018 of Nebraska: Chapter 29 Water Supply and Distribution

            Section P2912 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems, P2912.1 General

            The provisions of this section shall govern the construction, installation, alteration, and repair of rainwater collection and conveyance systems for the collection, storage, treatment, and distribution of rainwater for nonpotable applications, as permitted by the jurisdiction.

            (Link)

            Nevada

            It’s legal to utilize rainwater harvesting in Nevada for non-potable domestic use without having to prove the “use it or lose it” doctrine. Nevada Assembly Bill 138 defines rainwater harvesting, “may be collected without a water right or permit to appropriate water” as long as the required provisions apply.

            These provisions include the rainwater system must be collected from a single-family dwelling rooftop for non-potable domestic use, it doesn’t conflict with existing water rights, the storage capacity is 20,000-gallons or less, the capture area is an acre or less, the pipe distribution is ¼ mile or less, and it complies with the Department of Wildlife. If these provisions aren’t met, a rainwater system may require permitting with the relevant authorities.

            Rainwater system design and installation are regulated by the Residential Code 2018 of Nevada Chapter 29 Water Supply and Distribution, Section P2912 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems.

            Nevada Senate Bill 74 was approved into law on June 9, 2017. Link to SB74: Link. Nevada state water law has a “use it or lose it” doctrine where water rights not put to beneficial use can be passed on to someone else. There were also restrictions on using rainwater for anything other than for wildlife but SB74 created a few changes including allowing the use of a small-scale rainwater system without having to prove the “use it or lose it” doctrine and expanding the use for the water.

            • Nevada Research Division, Legislative Counsel Bureau Water Policy and Issues in Nevada: An Overview

            “Under prior Nevada water law, collection of rainwater was not allowed without a water right permit from the state engineer. However, minimal collection of rainwater can be beneficial for those homeowners looking to conserve water. Assembly Bill 138 allowed for the capture of rainwater from the roof of a single-family dwelling for non-potable domestic use without a water right. Provided there is no conflict with existing water rights, and other conditions are met, the measure also allowed for the capture of rainwater in a guzzler for use by wildlife.”

            (Link)

            • Low Impact Development in Northern Nevada: Rainwater Harvesting

            (Link)

            • Nevada Assembly Bill 138

            Existing law requires that subject to existing rights, the appropriation of any water in this State is subject to the provisions of chapter 533 of NRS, which, among other things, require any person seeking appropriate water to obtain a permit to do so. (NRS 533.030, 533.325) Section 1 of this bill provides that the de minimis collection of precipitation from the rooftop of a single-family dwelling for non-potable domestic use or, under certain circumstances, in a guzzler to provide water to wildlife is exempted from the requirements of chapter 533 of NRS and thus may be collected without water right or permit to appropriate water. Sections 2-5 of this bill make conforming changes.

            (Link)

            • Residential Code 2018 of Nevada, Chapter 29 Water Supply and Distribution

            Section P2912 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems, P2912.1 General

            The provisions of this section shall govern the construction, installation, alteration, and repair of rainwater collection and conveyance systems for the collection, storage, treatment, and distribution of rainwater for nonpotable applications, as permitted by the jurisdiction.

            P2912.2 Collection Surface

            Rainwater shall be collected only from above-ground impervious roofing surfaces constructed from approved materials. Collection of water from vehicular parking or pedestrian walkway surfaces shall be prohibited except where the water is used exclusively for landscape irrigation. Overflow and bleed-off pipes from roof-mounted appliances including, but not limited to, evaporative coolers, water heaters, and solar water heaters shall not discharge onto rainwater collection surfaces.

            (Link)

            New Hampshire

            Rainwater harvesting is legal in New Hampshire. It’s legal in New Hampshire to use rainwater harvesting for outdoor, non-potable use. There aren’t any current regulations on rainwater collection systems. There are a few guidelines as well as the Soak Up the Rain New Hampshire Project that promote rain barrels for water conservation.

            • New Hampshire Homeowner’s Guide to Stormwater Management Do-It-Yourself Stormwater Solutions

            (Link)

            • Soak Up the Rain New Hampshire Project

            Throughout New Hampshire, neighbors are planting rain gardens, using rain barrels, planting trees, and finding other ways to Soak Up the Rain to protect and restore clean water in their local lakes, streams, and estuaries. Explore this site to learn how you can Soak Up the Rain too.

            (Link)

            New Jersey

            It’s not illegal to harvest rainwater in New Jersey. Rooftop rainwater harvesting for outdoor, domestic use is legal in New Jersey. Rainwater collection is included in the New Jersey Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual as well as many public education resources. Rainwater systems may be eligible for the New Jersey Green Infrastructure Financing and have several past successful projects.

            There isn’t currently a Code present regulating rainwater harvesting in New Jersey but permitting may apply depending on the complexity of the system.

            • New Jersey Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual November 2018 Chapter 9.15 Cisterns

            (Link)

            • New Jersey Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resources Program Green Infrastructure Maintenance Manual, covers basic rainwater harvesting

            (Link)

            • New Jersey Water Savers A Municipal Guide to Promote Rooftop Rainwater Harvesting

            (Link)

            New Mexico

            It’s legal in New Mexico to use rainwater harvesting for outdoor domestic purposes only. The Office of the New Mexico State Engineer has a statement regarding rainwater systems, “Most homeowners can install and use a rainwater harvesting system for landscape irrigation without public health and water rights concerns. For larger-scale commercial projects, it is a good idea to check with the local OSE Water Rights Division to make sure the project does not inappropriately affect rainwater runoff into a stream system, therefore impacting a public water supply.”

            New Mexico Code R. § 14.8.2.27, Section 14.8.2.27 is based on the Uniform Plumbing Code, Chapter 16 Non-potable Rainwater Catchment Systems for regulation. There are a few resources for rainwater harvesting in New Mexico. Some municipalities offer financial incentives for rainwater harvesting, for example with the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Authority.

            • Office of the State Engineer Water Use & Conservation Rainwater Harvesting

            “Most homeowners can install and use a rainwater harvesting system for landscape irrigation without public health and water rights concerns. For larger-scale commercial projects, it is a good idea to check with the local OSE Water Rights Division to make sure the project does not inappropriately affect rainwater runoff into a stream system, therefore impacting a public water supply. Also, contact the local New Mexico Environment Department regarding any potential public health concerns. Please see Policy Development for the official policy on rainwater harvesting.”

            “11/24/2004 – The New Mexico Office of the State Engineer supports the wise and efficient use of the state’s water resources; and, therefore, encourages the harvesting, collection, and use of rainwater from residential and commercial roof surfaces for on-site landscape irrigation and other on-site domestic uses.

            The collection of water harvested in this manner should not reduce the amount of runoff that would have occurred from the site in its natural, pre-development state. Harvested rainwater may not be appropriated for any other uses.”

            (Link)

            • Roof-Reliant Landscaping™ Rainwater Harvesting with Cistern Systems in New Mexico

            (Link)

            • City of Albuquerque Rainwater Harvesting: Supply from the Sky

            (Link)

            • N.M. Code R. § 14.8.2.27, Current through Register Vol. 32, No. 3, February 9, 2021 Section 14.8.2.27 – CHAPTER 16 NONPOTABLE RAINWATER CATCHMENT SYSTEMS

            Refers to Uniform Plumbing Code: 14.8.2.27 NMAC – Rp, 14.8.2.27 NMAC, 6-28-13 Adopted by New Mexico Register, Volume XXVI, Issue 07, April 16, 2015, eff. 5/1/2015, Adopted by New Mexico Register, Volume XXIX, Issue 07, April 10, 2018, eff. 5/15/2018

            (Link)

            New York

            It’s not illegal to harvest rainwater in New York. It’s legal to utilize rainwater harvesting in New York for non-potable use. The Plumbing Code 2015 of the New York Section includes regulation in chapter 1303 Non-potable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems. Appendix C of the Plumbing Code Water Recycling Systems, Wastewater Recycling Systems, and Rainwater Recycling Systems further governs regulations.

            There are several rainwater harvesting guides specific to New York including one by the New York City Department of Environmental Protection.

            • New York State Rainwater Harvesting Guide

            (Link)

            • Plumbing Code 2015 of New York

            Section 1303 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems

            1303.1 General

            The provisions of Section 1303 shall govern the construction, installation, alteration, and repair of rainwater collection and conveyance systems for the collection, storage, treatment, and distribution of rainwater for nonpotable applications, as permitted by the jurisdiction.

            (Link)

            • Rainwater Harvesting 101, COUNCIL ON THE ENVIRONMENT OF NEW YORK CITY

            (Link)

            North Carolina

            It’s legal to harvest rainwater in North Carolina but there are several laws in place regarding it as well as storage regulations.

            House Bill 609 (2011) directs the Department of Environment and Natural Resources to provide statewide outreach and technical assistance regarding water efficiency, which includes the development of best management practices for community water efficiency and conservation. Best management practices include water reuse, including harvesting rainwater and using greywater.

            The North Carolina Building Code, 2009 NC Plumbing Code, Appendix C-1 Rain Water Recycling Systems sets regulations in both residential and commercial buildings. North Carolina House Bill 609 (2011) set statewide outreach and low-impact development goals that included rainwater harvesting to promote water efficiency and conservation.

            North Carolina State Law 243, passed in 2009, created the Plumbing Code regulations now found in the Building Code. The State Law also prevents any state, county, or local building code or regulation from prohibiting the use of cisterns for water reuse applications (including rainwater harvesting).

            • North Carolina State University offers online resources on rainwater harvesting. The NCDEQ Stormwater Design Manual also includes a chapter on rainwater systems.

            NCDEQ Stormwater Design Manual C-7. Rainwater Harvesting System 1 Revised: 11/20/2020 C-7.

            (Link)

            • General Assembly Of North Carolina Session Law 2009-243
            House Bill 749 *H749-v-4*

            An Act To Authorize The State Building Code To Permit The Use Of Cisterns To Provide Water For Flushing Toilets And For Outdoor Irrigation In The Construction Or Renovation Of Residential Or Commercial Buildings Or Structures And To Prohibit Any State, County, Or Local Building Code Or Regulation From Prohibiting The Use Of Cisterns For These Uses, And To Clarify Minority Business Purposes For Public Contracts.

            (Link)

            • General Assembly Of North Carolina, Session 2013 Session Law 2014-113 Senate Bill 163 *S163-v-3*

            An Act To Designate Reclaimed Water As A Source Water Under Certain Conditions

            (Link)

            • North Carolina State University Urban Waterways: Rainwater Harvesting: Guidance for Homeowners

            (Link)

            • Harvested rainwater can be collected from a building’s roof in a rain barrel or cistern, allowing it to be saved and used during dry periods.

            (Link)

            • North Carolina Building Code

            2009 NC Plumbing Code, Appendix C-1 Rain Water Recycling Systems. (080311 Item B6), APPENDIX C1 RAINWATER RECYCLING SYSTEMS

            (Link)

            North Dakota

            It’s legal to utilize rainwater harvesting in North Dakota for outdoor, domestic use. If the rainwater system supplies water for irrigation of more than 5-acres or is for industrial, municipal, rural use may require a water rights permit.

            Morton County in North Dakota offers a page on Rain Barrels.

            • North Dakota Century Code Title 61 Waters (1905)

            61-01-01. Water of the State-Public Waters. All waters within the limits of the state from the following sources of water supply belong to the public and are subject to appropriation for beneficial use and the right to the use of these waters for such use must be acquired pursuant to Chapter 61-04

            1. Surface Water, rivers, creeks, lakes, ponds, marshes

            2. All groundwater

            3. All residual waters from beneficial use and artificially drained

            4. All non-contributing streams

            A water permit is required for: Irrigation of more than five acres, Industrial use, Municipal use, Rural water system, Storage of more than 12.5 AF behind a dam.

            NOT REQUIRED FOR DOMESTIC OR STOCK USE

            North Dakota water law is based on the prior appropriation doctrine, where an established water right is superior to any water right with a later priority date.

            (Link)

            • A Reference Guide To North Dakota Waters: The guide covers water rights and doesn’t mention rainwater harvesting rather focuses on water conservation.

            (Link)

            • Morton County North Dakota: Rain Barrels

            (Link)

            Ohio

            Rainwater harvesting is legal in Ohio for both potable and non-potable use. Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) 3701-28-12 governs private water supplies and recycled water systems with regulation by the Ohio Department of Health. The Ohio Plumbing Code, Section 1105-08. – Rainwater Harvesting is based on the Uniform Plumbing Code and adapted by local municipalities.

            • The University of Toledo offers rainwater harvesting resources with online tools.

            (Link)

            • Ohio Department of Health, Plans for Developing a Rainwater Cistern or Hauled Water Supply
            “The construction of rainwater cisterns and hauled water storage tanks used as private water supplies in Ohio are covered in Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) 3701-28-12. Cistern and hauled water tank configurations may vary by the contractor and do not necessarily need to correspond with all of the examples provided in this document as long as it is constructed in compliance with the Rules. Contact your local health department for the necessary permits and for additional information.”

            (Link)

            • Cincinnati, Ohio – Code of Ordinances Chapter 1105 Plumbing Code Sec. 1105-08. – Rainwater Harvesting.

            (Link)

            • Ohio Cisterns and Hauled Water Storage Tanks Used As A Private Water System

            (Link)

            Oklahoma

            It’s legal to utilize rainwater harvesting in Oklahoma. The Plumbing Code 2015 of Oklahoma, Section 1303 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems regulate based on the Uniform Plumbing Code. Oklahoma House Bill 3055 (2012) created the Water for 2060 Act. This Act enacted Oklahoma becoming the first state to establish a statewide goal of water conservation – to consume the same amount of freshwater in 2060 that was consumed in 2010.

            The Act initiated grants for water conservation projects, including for rainwater harvesting systems.

            • Oklahoma State University offers online resources and guides on rainwater harvesting.

            (Link)

            • Design of Rainwater Harvesting Systems in Oklahoma

            (Link)

            • Water for 2060

            With the passage of House Bill 3055 (the Water For 2060 Act) in 2012, Oklahoma became the first state in the nation to establish a bold, statewide goal of consuming no more fresh water in 2060 than was consumed in 2010.

            (Link)

            • Plumbing Code 2015 of Oklahoma, Section 1303 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems

            1303.1 General

            The provisions of Section 1303 shall govern the construction, installation, alteration, and repair of rainwater collection and conveyance systems for the collection, storage, treatment, and distribution of rainwater for nonpotable applications, as permitted by the jurisdiction.

            (Link)

            Oregon

            Rainwater harvesting has limited legality in Oregon and may only be collected from an approved building rooftop. It’s encouraged to seek the local authority with jurisdiction before installing any sort of system. Oregon Building Codes Division Revised Statute §455.060 regulates the approval of rainwater harvesting systems as a statewide alternative method of providing water for non-potable uses. “Because of the efforts in Oregon to conserve water, the Building Codes Division has approved the use of rainwater harvesting systems as an alternate method to the state plumbing code.”

            The Bureau of Development Services Portland Oregon, Code Guide: Rainwater Harvesting – OPSC/6/#2 CODE: Oregon Plumbing, “Harvested rainwater is not considered potable (drinkable) water. When harvested rainwater is intended for irrigation only and the system is completely separate from the municipal water system and any plumbing in the structure, the system is not regulated by this code guide. Although no plumbing permit is required, these systems still need to be approved by the Bureau of Environmental Services (BES) for stormwater management.”

            There are several online guides directly from the State of Oregon on rainwater harvesting.

            “A few uses of surface water are exempt from the requirement to obtain a permit. These are called “exempt uses.” Exempt uses of surface water include:
            7. Rainwater: collection and use of rainwater from an artificial impervious surface (like a building’s roof).”

            Oregon Smart Guide – Rainwater Harvesting

            (Link)

            Oregon Building Codes Division approval of rainwater harvesting systems as a statewide alternative method of providing water for non-potable uses
            Statewide AlternateMethods are approved by the Division administrator in consultation with the appropriate advisory board. The advisory board’s review is limited to the technical and scientific facts of the proposal.

            In addition:

            – Building officials shall approve the use of any material, design, or method of construction addressed in a statewide alternate method.

            – The decision to use a statewide alternate method is at the discretion of the designer

            – Statewide alternate methods do not limit the authority of the building official to consider other proposed alternate methods encompassing the same subject matter

            (Link)

            Bureau of Development Services Portland Oregon, Code Guide: Rainwater Harvesting – OPSC/6/#2 CODE: Oregon Plumbing Specialty Code- 2014 Edition Oregon Residential Specialty Code- 2014 Edition SUBJECT: Rainwater Harvesting Systems for Non-potable Use for Residential or Commercial Uses

            Harvested rainwater is untreated rainwater collected for limited use in specific plumbing systems.

            Harvested rainwater is not considered potable (drinkable) water. When harvested rainwater is intended for irrigation only and the system is completely separate from the municipal water system and any plumbing in the structure, the system is not regulated by this code guide. Although no plumbing permit is required, these systems still need to be approved by the Bureau of Environmental Services (BES) for stormwater management. In addition, other permits, such as an electrical permit for any pumps installed or a grading permit for underground pipe installation, may be necessary depending upon system size and complexity.

            (Link)

            State of Oregon Building Codes Division, Alternate Method Ruling No. OPSC 08-01

            Approval of OPSC 08-01 Rainwater Harvesting Systems for Residential Potable Uses as a Statewide Alternate Method

            “Rainwater recycling systems have been installed in the state as alternate methods under local approval. Previously, no consistent installation standard had been established for rainwater plumbing systems throughout the state. This ruling will provide a consistent standard for the installation of rainwater harvesting on a statewide basis.… This ruling applies to all rainwater harvesting systems statewide as an alternate method to that addressed in the state building code.”

            (Link)

            The State of Oregon, Water Resources Department: Oregon Water Rights
            “Under Oregon law, all water belongs to the public. With some exceptions, cities, irrigators, businesses, and other water users must obtain a permit or license from the Water Resources Department to use water from any source – whether it is underground, or from lakes or streams. Generally speaking, landowners with water flowing past, through, or under their property do not automatically have the right to use that water without authorization from the Department.”

            “A few uses of surface water are exempt from the requirement to obtain a permit. These are called “exempt uses.” Exempt uses of surface water include:

            7. Rainwater: collection and use of rainwater from an artificial impervious surface (like a building’s roof).”

            (Link)

            (Link to Entire Publication)

            Eugene Green Building: Harvesting Rainwater Capturing rain to use on-site
            To use rainwater for indoor nonpotable uses, like flushing toilets and clothes washing, you’ll need to apply for:

            • A plumbing permit to prevent contamination of drinking water;

            • An electrical permit for the pump or other electrical controls;

            • Building permits for cistern or underground tank installation may be required. Grading or erosion control review may also be needed for underground tanks.

            To use rainwater for drinking water, you’ll need to apply for the permits described above and meet standards set by the Oregon Building Codes Division. The water must be treated to meet Federal safe drinking water standards.

            (Link)

            Pennsylvania

            It’s not illegal to harvest rainwater in Pennsylvania. It’s legal in Pennsylvania to utilize rainwater harvesting for non-potable applications, as permitted by the jurisdiction. The Plumbing Code 2009 of Pennsylvania, Section 1303 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems provide regulations that are based on the Uniform Plumbing Code.

            “Drinking water, potable water or water—Safe drinking water as defined in the Pennsylvania Safe Drinking Water Act (35 P. S. § § 721.1—721.17). The term does not include water such as boiler water, mop water, rainwater, wastewater, and ‘‘nondrinking’’ water.”

            • Pennsylvania State offers a guide on Rainwater Cisterns. The Pennsylvania Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual covers water reuse for non-potable applications such as fire protection.

            (Link)

            • Pennsylvania. Penn State Rainwater Cisterns: Design, Construction, and Treatment

            (Link)

            • Plumbing Code 2009 of Pennsylvania, Section 1303 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems

            1303.1 General

            The provisions of Section 1303 shall govern the construction, installation, alteration, and repair of rainwater collection and conveyance systems for the collection, storage, treatment, and distribution of rainwater for nonpotable applications, as permitted by the jurisdiction.

            (Link)

            • Drinking water, potable water or water—Safe drinking water as defined in the Pennsylvania Safe Drinking Water Act (35 P. S. § § 721.1—721.17). The term does not include water such as boiler water, mop water, rainwater, wastewater, and ‘‘nondrinking’’ water.

            (Link)

            Puerto Rico

            It’s legal to use rainwater harvesting in Puerto Rico for non-potable and potable drinking water use. The Puerto Rico Plumbing Code, Chapter 13 Nonpotable Water Systems and Section 1301 and Chapter 29, Water Supply and Distribution, Section P2901.1 provide regulations. The 2016 Puerto Rico Building Code, Chapter 29 Water Supply and Distribution Section P2901 also provides regulations and requirements for systems.

            Plenitud Puerto Rico is a 501c3 non-profit educational farm and community dedicated to service and sustainability.

            (Link)

            • 2016 PUERTO RICO BUILDING CODE CHAPTER 29 – WATER SUPPLY AND DISTRIBUTION SECTION P2901 GENERAL P2901.1

            Potable water is required. Where color is used for marking, purple shall be used to identify municipally reclaimed water, rainwater, and gray water 85 distribution systems. Any non-potable outlet that could inadvertently be used for drinking or domestic purposes shall be posted.

            (Link)

            • 2018 Plumbing Code of Puerto Rico, Chapter 29 Water Supply and Distribution

            (Link)

            Rhode Island

            It’s not illegal to harvest rainwater in Rhode Island and is encouraged with incentives. Rainwater harvesting is legal in Rhode Island for non-potable use. Rhode Island House Bill 7070 (2012) created a state personal income tax credit for the installation of cisterns for rainwater harvesting. The 2019 Rhode Island Plumbing Code includes section 1303 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection that sets regulations.

            Rhode Island House Bill 7070 (2012) created a tax credit for the installation of cisterns to collect rainwater. Any individual or business that installs a cistern on their property to collect rainwater for use in their home or business is entitled to a state income tax credit of 10 percent of the cost of installing the cistern not to exceed $1,000. Each entity is allowed only one tax credit over the life of the cistern unless they are replacing an existing cistern with a larger cistern and have not received the maximum tax credit of $1,000. A cistern is defined as a container holding fifty or more gallons of diverted rainwater or snowmelt, either above or below ground (Rhode Island General Laws § 44-30-28).

            • State Of Rhode Island In General Assembly January Session, A.D. 2012 Relating To Taxation — Personal Income Tax

            44-30-28. Tax credit for installation of cisterns. – Any individual or business that installs a cistern on their property to collect rainwater for use in their home or business shall be entitled to a state income tax credit of ten percent (10%) of the cost of installing the cistern not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). Each entity shall be allowed only one tax credit over the life of the cistern unless they are replacing an existing cistern with a larger cistern and have not received the maximum tax credit of one thousand dollars ($1,000).

            (Link)

            • 2019 Rhode Island Plumbing Code

            1303 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems, Section 1303 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems

            1303.1 General

            The provisions of Section 1303 shall govern the construction, installation, alteration, and repair of rainwater collection and conveyance systems for the collection, storage, treatment, and distribution of rainwater for nonpotable applications, as permitted by the jurisdiction.

            1303.2 Collection Surface

            Rainwater shall be collected only from above-ground impervious roofing surfaces constructed from approved materials and where approved, vehicular parking or pedestrian walking surfaces.

            (Link)

            South Carolina

            It is not illegal to harvest rainwater harvest in South Carolina nor are there any current state statutes regarding it. It’s legal in South Carolina to use rainwater harvesting for non-potable, outdoor applications. The 2015 Plumbing Code of South Carolina, Section 1303 Non-potable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems provide regulation.

            The Low Impact Development in Coastal South Carolina online resource includes a chapter on rainwater harvesting for sustainable stormwater management. Clemson University offers a free guide, Rainwater Harvesting for Homeowners.

            (Link)

            • Low Impact Development in Coastal South Carolina: A Planning and Design Guide

            4.6 Rainwater Harvesting

            Plumbing Code. This specification does not address indoor plumbing or disinfection issues. Designers and plan reviewers should refer to the 2012 Uniform Plumbing Code – Chapter 17 Nonpotable Rainwater Catchment Systems, or local plumbing codes, as applicable. For sizing of conveyance systems refer to Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC) 2012 Edition, Chapter 11: “Storm Drainage” section.

            (Link)

            • 2015 Plumbing Code of South Carolina, Section 1303 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems

            1303.1 General

            The provisions of Section 1303 shall govern the construction, installation, alteration, and repair of rainwater collection and conveyance systems for the collection, storage, treatment, and distribution of rainwater for nonpotable applications, as permitted by the jurisdiction.

            1303.2 Collection Surface

            Rainwater shall be collected only from above-ground impervious roofing surfaces constructed from approved materials. Collection of water from vehicular parking or pedestrian surfaces shall be prohibited except where the water is used exclusively for landscape irrigation. Overflow and bleed-off pipes from roof-mounted appliances including, but not limited to, evaporative coolers, water heaters, and solar water heaters shall not discharge onto rainwater collection surfaces.

            (Link)

            • UpState Forever: LID Rainwater Harvesting

            UpState Forever is This online, interactive course is designed to help Greenville South Carolina residents, business owners, and neighborhood leaders understand processes that drive local planning and land use policy decisions, as well as the roles and perspectives of diverse stakeholders.

            (Link)

            South Dakota

            It is not illegal to harvest rainwater harvest in South Dakota nor are there any current state statutes regarding it. It’s legal in South Dakota to use rainwater harvesting without a water rights permit for non-potable, domestic, outdoor use that doesn’t exceed 25,920-gallons per day of water use. Rainwater hasn’t been included in the South Dakota Building or Plumbing Code.

            The South Dakota Department of Environmental & Natural Resources states that all water, surface, and ground, is the property of the people of the state. Whether or not a water rights permit is required depends on the type of water used.

            South Dakota Department of Environment & Natural Resources: Who needs a water rights permit?

            “In South Dakota, all water (surface and groundwater) is the property of the people of the state and whether you need a water right permit depends on the type of your water use.”

            “The only type of water use which does not require a water right permit is domestic use. However, even domestic use of water requires a permit if your water use exceeds either 25,920 gallons per day or a peak pump rate of 25 gallons per minute. Examples of domestic water uses are:

            1) drinking, washing, sanitary, and culinary uses by an individual or household,

            2) irrigation of a noncommercial garden, trees, etc. not exceeding one acre in size,

            3) stock watering and 4) 18 gallons per minute for use in schools, parks, and public recreation areas.”

            (Link)

            SOUTH DAKOTA DROUGHT MITIGATION PLAN Prepared by the South Dakota Drought Task Force

            Rainwater harvesting is cited three times as a solution for water conservation and management.

            (Link)

            Tennessee

            It’s not illegal to harvest rainwater in Tennessee. It’s legal to utilize rooftop rainwater harvesting in Tennessee for non-potable, outdoor use. Tennessee SB 2417 / HB 1850 authorizes green infrastructure practices for sustainable stormwater management and expands the definition of green infrastructure to include rainwater collection.

            The Tennessee Permanent Stormwater Management and Design Guidance Manual have included a chapter on rainwater harvesting that details out where a permit could be applicable. The City of Nashville, Best Management Practices includes a chapter on rainwater harvesting.

            • City of Nashville Volume 5 – Best Management Practices, Permanent Treatment Management Practices, Rain Tanks / Cisterns resource

            (Link)

            • SB 2417 / HB 1850 (Enacted) Authorizes the use of green infrastructure practices within areas that have combined sanitary sewage and stormwater systems

            (Link)

            • Tennessee Permanent Stormwater Management and Design Guidance Manual, 5.4.10 Rainwater Harvesting

            Rainwater can be used as a resource when it is captured from impervious surfaces, stored in cisterns or rain barrels, and reused as non-potable water. Captured rainwater can be used for landscape irrigation, firefighting needs, toilet flushing, or other greywater uses. Toilet flushing in high-use buildings (i.e., schools, visitor centers) is one of the most effective reuse methods.

            (Link)

            Texas

            It’s completely legal and encouraged to harvest rainwater in Texas. There are tax incentives, rebates as well as other incentives based on your location in Texas for rainwater harvesting.

            House Bill 3391 (2011) is one of the most far-reaching and comprehensive pieces of legislation regarding rainwater harvesting in recent years. Among its provisions:

            • Financial institutions may consider making loans for developments that will use harvested rainwater as the sole source of water supply.

            • Rainwater harvesting system technology for potable and non-potable indoor use and landscape watering is required to be incorporated into the design and construction of each new state building with a roof measuring at least 50,000 square feet that are located in an area of the state in which the average annual rainfall is at least 20 inches.

            • Rules regarding the installation and maintenance of rainwater harvesting systems that are used for indoor potable purposes and connected to a public water supply system are required to be developed, prior to this bill it could only be used for non-potable purposes. The rules must include criteria to ensure that safe drinking water standards are met and the water does not come in contact with the public water supply at a location off of the property.

            • A person who intends to connect a rainwater harvesting system to a public water supply system for potable purposes is required to give written notice to the municipality or the owner or operator of the public water supply system. A municipality or public water supply system may not be held liable for any adverse health effects allegedly caused by the consumption of water collected by a rainwater harvesting system that is connected to a public water supply system and is used for potable purposes if the municipality or the public water supply system is in compliance with the sanitary standards for drinking water.

            • Each municipality and county are encouraged to promote rainwater harvesting at residential, commercial, and industrial facilities through incentives such as the provision of a discount of rain barrels or rebates for water storage facilities.  The Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) is required to ensure that training on rainwater harvesting is available for the members of the permitting staff of municipalities and counties at least quarterly. School districts are strongly encouraged to implement rainwater harvesting systems.

            • A municipality or county is prohibited from denying a building permit solely because the facility will implement rainwater harvesting.

            Texas, “House Bill 2430 directs the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to establish recommended standards for the domestic use of harvested rainwater, including health and safety standards. It also directs them to develop standards for collection methods for harvesting rainwater intended for drinking, cooking, and bathing.”

            (Link)

            The Plumbing Code of Texas includes Section 1303 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems for regulation without a permit required.

            Texas A&M AgriLife Extension offers public education and resources on rainwater harvesting on their extensive research and development. The AgriLife rainwater harvesting manual is cited in almost every state in America as the leading resource. The Texas Water Development Board has worked with AgriLife to provide another rainwater harvesting resource.

            (Link)

            Rainwater Harvesting Potential and Guidelines for Texas:

            (Link)

            Texas House Bill 3391 (2011) Rainwater Harvesting And Other Water Conservation Initiatives

            (Link)

            Bill Analysis

            (Link)

            Free Texas rainwater harvesting guides and resources

            (Link)

            Texas has one of the most comprehensive laws protecting rainwater harvesting, the Texas House Bill 3391. In 2001, Texas excluded components of rainwater harvesting systems from sales tax, Section 151.355 of the Texas Tax Code.

            (Link)

            Plumbing Code of Texas: Section 1303 Nonpotable Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems

            1303.1 General

            The provisions of Section 1303 shall govern the construction, installation, alteration, and repair of rainwater collection and conveyance systems for the collection, storage, treatment, and distribution of rainwater for nonpotable applications, as permitted by the jurisdiction.

            (Link)

            Utah

            Rainwater harvesting is regulated with limited legality in Utah. Rainwater harvesting is only legal in Utah when the system directly rooftop captures rainwater on land owned or leased by the person responsible for the collection, for non-potable purposes. Utah Senate Bill 32 (2010), a person registered with the Division of Water Resources may collect and store no more than 2,500 gallons of rainwater. If unregistered, no more than two containers may be used, and the maximum storage capacity of any one container shall not be greater than 100 gallons (Utah Code Annotated §73-3-1.5). The website to register with the Utah Division of Water Rights: here.

            The Plumbing Code of Utah includes Chapter 13 Nonpotable Water Systems for regulation. Anyone who constructs a rainwater harvesting system with storage greater than 100-gallons must register with the Utah Division of Water Rights.

            “To collect, store, and place the captured precipitation to a beneficial use, a person must register the user with the Utah Division of Water Rights as detailed in 73-3-1.5.”

            Utah Water Rights

            (Link)

            • Utah Senate Bill 32 (2010) Rainwater Harvesting 2010 General Session 3 State Of Utah

            (Link)

            • Utah Code Annotated §73-3-1.5 Capture and storage of precipitation

            (Link)

            • Utah Division of Water Rights: Rainwater Harvesting Registration

            To collect, store, and place the captured precipitation to beneficial use, a person must register the user with the Utah Division of Water Rights as detailed in 73-3-1.5.

            A person may collect and store precipitation without registering in no more than two covered storage containers if neither covered container has a maximum storage capacity of greater than 100 gallons.

            The total allowed storage capacity with registration is no more than 2,500 gallons. Collection and use are limited to the same parcel of land on which the water is captured and stored.

            (Link)

            • Feasibility of Rainwater Harvesting for Urban Water Management in Salt Lake City

            (Link)

            • Plumbing Code of Utah, Chapter 13 Nonpotable Water Systems, Section 1301 General

            1301.1 Scope

            The provisions of Chapter 13 shall govern the materials, design, construction, and installation of systems for the collection, storage, treatment, and distribution of nonpotable water. The use and application of nonpotable water shall comply with laws, rules, and ordinances applicable in the jurisdiction

            (Link)

            Vermont

            It’s legal for individual homeowners in Vermont to utilize rainwater harvesting for non-potable, outdoor use without a water rights permit. There aren’t any specific pieces of legislation or code on rainwater harvesting in Vermont. The Vermont Watershed Management Division is the authority on water rights for the state.

            • The Vermont Guide to Stormwater Management for Homeowners and Small Businesses recommends rainwater harvesting for water conservation.

            Vermont GUIDE TO STORMWATER MANAGEMENT for Homeowners and Small Businesses

            – Recommends rainwater harvesting for water conservation and stormwater management

            – Rainwater “Provides supplemental, non-potable water supply for irrigation”

            (Link)

            • Vermont Watershed Management Division

            (Link)

            • 2017 Vermont Stormwater Management Manual Rule and Design Guidance

            In Vermont, the reuse of harvested rainwater for purposes other than irrigation is largely unaddressed by current state regulations or local codes. Neither the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC) nor International Plumbing Code (IPC) directly Vermont Stormwater Treatment Standards Subchapter 4.0 4-92 addresses rainwater harvesting in their potable or stormwater sections (EPA 2008). Because of this lack of specific rainwater harvesting guidance, some jurisdictions have regulated harvested rainwater as reclaimed water, resulting in stringent requirements that make reusing harvested rainwater challenging. The practicality of rainwater reuse will need to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

            – Rainwater harvesting shall be limited to rooftop runoff

            (Link)

            Virginia

            It’s legal and encouraged to harvest rainwater in Virginia. It’s legal to utilize rainwater harvesting in Virginia but may fall under reclaimed water regulations depending on the jurisdiction. Virginia Senate Bill 1416 (2001) established the Alternative Water Supply Assistance Fund that provides a tax credit to individuals and businesses for installing rainwater systems.

            The 2012 Virginia Plumbing Code, Chapter 13 Nonpotable Water Systems sets regulations. The 2017 Vermont Stormwater Management Manual addresses the current state of rainwater harvesting in the state. The Virginia Tech Cooperative Extension has an online resource, Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 6: Rainwater Harvesting.

            (Link)

            • Virginia Rainwater Harvesting Manual Compiled by The Cabell Brand Center

            (Link)

            • Virginia House Bill 1949 (Prior Session Legislation) Bill Title: Rainwater harvesting; water for human consumption.

            A BILL to amend and reenact §32.1-248.2 of the Code of Virginia, relating to rainwater harvesting; water for human consumption.

            (Link)

            • 2012 Virginia Plumbing Code, Chapter 13 Nonpotable Water Systems, Section 1301 General

            1301.1 Scope

            The provisions of Chapter 13 shall govern the materials, design, construction, and installation of nonpotable water systems subject to this code. In addition to the applicable provision of this section, reclaimed water shall comply with the requirements of Section 1304.

            (Link)

            Washington

            Rainwater harvesting is legal in Washington from a building rooftop with the water utilized on the property for outdoor, non-potable use. The State of Washington Department of Ecology stated that rainwater harvesting doesn’t require a water permit as long as a few conditions don’t apply.

            Rainwater must be used on the property where it was collected

            Rainwater can only be collected from existing building rooftops that have another purpose other than harvesting water.

            – The rainwater system cannot negatively affect existing water rights in the area.

            – Local restrictions may be developed to govern new systems, including for potable applications.

            Washington Revised Code §36.89.080 offers the ability to reduce surface and stormwater fees by 10-50% that utilize rainwater harvesting. Systems are regulated by the Washington State Building Code: Chapter 16 Non-potable rainwater catchment systems.

            • Seattle Public Utilities offers Rainwater Harvesting resources online.

            (Link)

            • State of Washington Department of Ecology: Water Rights

            (Link)

            • Washington Revised Code §36.89.080

            (Link)

            • Washington State Building Code: Chapter 16—Nonpotable rainwater catchment systems.

            (Link)

            • State of Washington Department of Ecology: Rainwater harvesting

            When does rainwater collection require a permit?

            Under our current policy, you don’t need a water right permit to collect rainwater, with a few conditions:

            – Rainwater must be used on the property where it is collected.

            – Rainwater can only be collected from existing structures that have another purpose other than collecting rainwater.

            – If we find that rainwater collection is negatively affecting existing water rights in an area, local restrictions may be developed to govern new systems. However, we do not expect the collection of harvested rainwater to cause problems.

            – If you are planning to use rainwater as your primary drinking water source for new building construction, you’ll need to check with your county to see if it is allowed.

            (Link)

            West Virginia

            In West Virginia, it’s legal to utilize rooftop rainwater harvesting from a home or business for non-potable use.

            “Designers and plan reviewers should consult the local and state building and health codes to determine the allowable indoor uses and required treatment for harvested rainwater. In cases where a municipal backup supply is used, Rainwater Harvesting systems must have backflow preventers or air gaps to keep harvested water separate from the main water supply. Pipes and spigots using rainwater must be clearly labeled as non-potable.” – West Virginia Stormwater Management & Design Guidance Manual: 4.2.8. Rainwater Harvesting

            • West Virginia Stormwater Management & Design Guidance Manual

            (Link)

            • West Virginia Water Laws Water Regulations And Water Rights

            West Virginia Code § 22-11-2 holds that “[i]t is the public policy of the State of West Virginia that the water resources of this State with respect to the quantity thereof be available for reasonable use by all of the citizens of this State.”

            (Link)

            • West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection: How to Build and Install a Rain Barrel

            (Link)

            • West Virginia Stormwater Management and Design Guidance Manual by West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (WVDEP)

            In cases where a municipal backup supply is used, Rainwater Harvesting systems must have backflow preventers or air gaps to keep harvested water separate from the main water supply. Pipes and spigots using rainwater must be clearly labeled as non-potable.

            (Link)

            Wisconsin

            Rainwater harvesting is legal in Wisconsin for non-potable, outdoor applications. Wisconsin Administrative Code Section 382 provides guidance on the use of rainwater harvesting. Rainwater systems in Wisconsin aren’t required to get a permit if:

            – Rainwater isn’t stored in an underground collection tank

            – The rainwater system isn’t directly connected to the public water supply

            – The rainwater system doesn’t connect to the water inside of the building

            – The rainwater cannot be used for potable applications

            Wisconsin Administrative Code Section 382: Design, Construction, Installation, Supervision, Maintenance And Inspection Of Plumbing

            (Link)

            Rainwater Collection Guidelines For Milwaukee Residents & Property Owners City Of Milwaukee, Environmental Collaboration Office Uwm School Of Freshwater Sciences

            In Wisconsin, there are no laws preventing RWH but there are some rules that control what you can and cannot do with the collected Water (p1)

            You do NOT need a permit to harvest rainwater in the City of Milwaukee provided your system a) does not have an underground collection tank, b) is not directly connected to the public water supply, c) does not supply water inside your building, and d) is not used for potable applications. That means you cannot drink it, nor can you clean or cook food with it. (p2)

            Wisconsin law does not specifically address water reuse the same way as other states but the Administrative Code Section 382 provides guidance on what we can and cannot do with harvested rainwater.

            Collected rainwater should not be brought into the home for reasons other than watering plants unless you have a permit from the City

            (Link)

            Wyoming

            It’s legal to use rainwater harvesting in Wyoming for non-potable, outdoor use. Wyoming water rights are based on the “doctrine of prior appropriation”. The doctrine stands that the first person to put the water to beneficial use has the first right, or “first in time is first in right”. Rainwater is considered as being put to beneficial use, as promoted by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality.

            • The Urban Best Management Practice Manual Conservation Practices to Protect Surface and Ground Water includes a chapter on rainwater harvesting in Wyoming.

            (Link)

            • The Wyoming State Engineer’s Office regulates water rights

            (Link)

            • City of Gillette Wyoming Rain Barrel Rebate Program

            (Link)

            U.S. Virgin Islands

            It’s legal to utilize rainwater harvesting in the U.S. Virgin Islands for all applications and is required on most new construction since 1964. U.S. Virgin Island Code Title 29 §308 requires most newly constructed buildings to be installed with a self-sustaining potable water system, such as a well or rainwater collection system.

            • U.S. Virgin Island Code Title 29 §308

            (a) General. After May 1, 1964, no building; except commercial developments dwellings and single unit apartments with connected access to the potable water system, shall be constructed, enlarged, or moved unless the owner thereof shall make provision for self-sustaining water supply system. This system shall consist of a well or rainwater collection area and cistern.

            (Link)

            • Minimum design requirements for domestic rainwater-harvesting systems on small volcanic islands in the Eastern Caribbean to prevent related water quality and quantity issues

            R. Reijtenbagh, Published 2010, Environmental Science

            (Link)

             


            START WITH A QUOTE

            Call Now (877) 223-7784





               

               

               

              Resorts World Bimini is a 750-acre premier luxury beachfront resort that spans nearly half the island of Bimini. The resort boasts the largest marina complex in the Bahamas and is the center of the sports fishing capital of the world. The resort is located on the westernmost island of the Bahamas, 50 miles from Florida, directly affected by cyclonic weather.

               

              Richard Dunfield of Pioneer Water Tanks America worked with the resort and engineers to specify a Cyclonic XLE 10/05 model. The Industratex® 420 liner utilized in the tank is NSF/ANSI Standard 61 certified. The Industratex® 420 liner is secured to the tank wall at multiple points to provide optimal support.

               

              Pioneer Water Tanks Industratex® 420 Liner
              Pioneer Water Tanks Industratex® 420 Liner

               

              The cyclonic roof structure engineering is ready to withstand high winds caused by hurricanes. The proprietary cyclonic roof of Pioneer Water Tanks is designed with roof trusses of greater depth and closer spacing to withstand higher wind velocities expected in Cyclonic Regions C and D.

               

              The COLORBOND® finish helps to protect the tank from the harsh seawater environment. The Pioneer Water Tank was opted in Surfmist® COLORBOND® Ultra steel to compliment the aesthetic of the white sandy beaches and turquoise waters.

              Pioneer Water Tanks Fire Suppression
              Pioneer Water Tanks Fire Suppression

               

              The project acts as a fire suppression water tank that feeds the pump for a sprinkler system servicing a warehouse. The warehouse will house future engineering offices at the resort. Ben Pedraza with Pioneer Water Tanks America, Joe Carter with JC Construction, and Orville with local construction provided the installation. The clients are satisfied with the completed Pioneer Water Tank and are impressed with the efficient install.

               

              Pioneer Water Tanks America Installation Crew Led by Ben Pedraza
              Pioneer Water Tanks America Installation Crew Led by Ben Pedraza

               


              Pioneer Water Tanks America is ready to provide top-tier water storage solutions with our network of local providers.

              Call Now (877) 223-7784





                 


                 

                 

                The Pioneer Water Tanks America network of water professionals provides outstanding local service and support from start to finish. Quality water storage solutions for rainwater harvesting systems, fire protection, drinking water, well water, irrigation, and more safely store with Pioneer Water Tanks.

                We recognize accredited providers within our network who stand out in excellence. From local sales to onsite installations, the Pioneer Dealer Direct® network continues to Lead the Way in Water.

                 

                 
                 

                Best Business Branding Pacific Blue Catchment
                Best Business Branding 2021 Pacific Blue Catchment

                 

                Best Business Branding

                Pacific Blue Catchment

                For twelve years on the Big Island of Hawaii, Pacific Blue Catchment has designed, installed, and maintained water systems for residents and businesses. Recently, the sustainable water-focused company renewed its website and branding to continue expanding for its clients. Visit https://www.pacificbluecatchment.org/ to see the Best Business Branding.

                 

                Customer Service Award 2021 Rain Ranchers
                Customer Service Award 2021 Rain Ranchers

                 

                Customer Service Award

                Rain Ranchers

                The Rain Ranchers are well known for their outstanding customer service on their efficient rainwater harvesting systems. Repeat customers and referrals continue to praise this family-owned business. Learn more at https://rainranchers.com/

                 

                Installation Excellence Award Dan Fleming with ARainDance Construction
                Installation Excellence Award Dan Fleming with ARainDance Construction

                 

                Installation Excellence Award

                Dan Fleming with ARainDance Construction

                Dan Fleming with ARainDance Construction has been with Pioneer Water Tanks since the beginning and is the first installer in America. Clients and dealers are continuously impressed with the installations provided by ARainDance Construction. The professionalism and expertise of Dan Fleming are highly regarded in the industry and within our network. Pioneer Water Tanks America appreciates the years of excellence with Dan Fleming; we look forward to a successful future.

                 

                Top New Dealer Living Water Industries
                Top New Dealer Living Water Industries

                 

                Top New Dealer

                Living Water Industries

                Living Water Industries recently joined the network of Pioneer Water Tanks America and is already taking off. The Phoenix, Arizona-based company focuses on providing rainwater systems. Even with the challenges that being in a water scarcity state brings, Living Water Industries helps its clients with sustainable solutions. Visit https://livingwaterindustries.com/ for more information.

                 

                Top Sales Growth Harvested Rain Solutions
                Top Sales Growth Harvested Rain Solutions

                 

                Top Sales Growth

                Harvested Rain Solutions

                Harvested Rain Solutions are committed to helping Central Texans utilize rainwater as a sustainable water source. HRS is well known for expert rainwater system design, installation and thrives as a top industry leader. Visit
                https://harvestedrainsolutions.com/ for more information.

                 

                Top Sales Other Regions Rainwater Equipment LLC
                Top Sales Other Regions Rainwater Equipment LLC

                 

                Top Sales Other Regions

                Rainwater Equipment, LLC

                Rainwater Equipment is a nationwide supplier of Pioneer Water Tanks and other water system components. The first Pioneer Water Tank installed in New Hampshire is provided by Rainwater Equipment for fire protection. Rainwater Equipment branches out nationwide, on top of providing product knowledge. Learn more at https://rainwaterequipment.com/ 

                 

                Top Hawaii Dealer Pacific Blue Catchment
                Top Hawaii Dealer Pacific Blue Catchment

                 

                Top Hawaii Dealer

                Pacific Blue Catchment

                Pacific Blue Catchment is the top Big Island of Hawaii residential and commercial rainwater harvesting provider. The top priority of Pacific Blue Catchment is to help customers in Hawaii learn and fulfill rainwater harvesting. Visit https://www.pacificbluecatchment.org/

                 

                Top International Dealer APROMSA
                Top International Dealer APROMSA

                 

                Top International Dealer

                APROMSA

                APROMSA is the premier provider of Pioneer Water Tanks in Mexico. The engineering and design divisions of APROMSA serve the storage needs for fire protection, mining, agricultural, municipal systems, and other industrial applications. Learn more about the design and installation services of APROMSA at https://www.apromsa.com/

                Top California Dealer Watermark Rainwater Harvesting

                Top California Dealer Watermark Rainwater Harvesting

                Top California Dealer

                Watermark Rainwater Harvesting

                Watermark Rainwater Harvesting, LLC is leading the way in California with Pioneer Water Tanks. Watermark LLC is well-known for its expert installations for applications including fire protection and large industrial systems. Visit https://watermarkh2o.com/ for more information.

                 

                Top Texas Dealer Harvested Rain Solutions
                Top Texas Dealer Harvested Rain Solutions

                 

                Top Texas Dealer

                Harvested Rain Solutions

                Harvested Rain Solutions are based in Central Texas, focusing on complete rainwater harvesting systems. The satisfied clients of HRS speak volumes about why they are the Top Texas Dealer. “Ron at Harvested Rain Solutions sets the standard for amazing customer service and responsiveness. He worked with us to come up with a custom plan for a rainwater collection system for our home, helped us select the right tanks, he worked with our landscaper on the irrigation system, and his team performed a flawless installation. He answers emails, texts, and calls promptly. Harvested Rain Solutions is by far the best experience we’ve ever had with contractors working on our home improvements. It’s been more than two years since he did the work for us and he’ll immediately follow up if there are any issues our questions with our system.” — Leah B.
                Visit https://harvestedrainsolutions.com/ for more information.

                 


                Pioneer Water Tanks America is ready to provide top-tier water storage solutions with our network of local providers.

                Call Now (877) 223-7784





                   


                   

                   

                   

                  Pioneer Water Tanks crate delivery and onsite installation enable a quick turnaround to clean water storage. Water storage is ready to go immediately after the installation inspection is approved in a Pioneer Water Tank. Concrete water tanks installation times can last for several weeks up to months, on top of 28-days or longer curing time.

                   

                  Concrete can take 28 days or more to be fully cured, on top of several weeks or months of installation time.

                  Pioneer Water Tanks are usable after installation that can take a day to a week. 

                  Most concrete water tanks require an expensive full-slab base with rows of concrete footings under the tank structure. 

                  Our network builds Pioneer Water Tanks on either a residential prepared sand/rock aggregate pad or a Reinforced Concrete Ring Beam Foundation. The Pioneer ring beam is a relatively simple and time-efficient base to construct at a fraction of the cost of a concrete slab.  

                  Liner rubs against concrete and breaks down over time

                  PIONEER V-LOCK® structure is the strength of corrugated steel and maintains support for the liner

                  Recyclable – can be broken down and used again

                  Recyclable and moveable – ZINCALUME® steel is utilized again and again

                  Requires heavy machinery and expensive delivery for precast concrete tanks, cement materials

                  Pioneer Water Tanks have crate delivery to the project site. Installers never need to use heavy machinery or weld when building Pioneer Water Tanks. 

                  Tank owners are unable to move or alter concrete tanks without compromising tank integrity. 

                  Pioneer Water Tanks are moveable and customizable even after the installation is complete. 

                  Concrete tanks are known to crack from shifting soil, weathering, extreme events, etc. 

                  The structural integrity of ZINCALUME® steel Pioneer Water Tanks is proven to outlast intensive environments and extreme weather events, including fire immersion.

                  Water vapor leaves concrete surfaces based on the Moisture Vapor Emission Rate (MVER), concrete tank walls have a water loss. 

                  Water is stored within the AQUALINER® Fresh tank liner, protected within the sealed Pioneer Water Tank body. The sealed roof of a Pioneer Water Tank helps to prevent water loss.   

                   

                   

                  The Pioneer Ring Beam represents 80% savings compared to the cost of an equal-capacity concrete water tank foundation. Residential Pioneer Water Tanks also have the cost-saving option of a prepared sand/rock aggregate pad. Concrete water tanks require expensive full-slab bases with intricate rows of concrete footings. The cost and time frame comparison are unmatched even from the start with the base construction.

                  Pioneer Water Tanks anchored foundation
                  Concrete Ring Beam Base of a Pioneer Water Tank

                   

                  PIONEER V-LOCK® Tank Profile design is unique to Pioneer Water Tanks. The proprietary corrugation profile enables maximum strength while supporting the AQUALINER® Fresh tank liner. PIONEER V-LOCK® tank design prevents wicking as well as provides multiple connection points down the liner for support.

                  PIONEER V LOCK Tank Structure
                  PIONEER V-LOCK® Tank Structure

                   

                  The waterproofing of concrete water tanks breaks down over time into the water supply. Concrete tank walls rub against liners that cause the need for repair or replacement. Some concrete tanks lack an interior coating that can affect the water quality and lead to water loss.

                  ZINCALUME® Steel recycles potentially endlessly. The engineering of Pioneer Water Tanks enables deconstruction for moving to a different location. Only accredited providers can deconstruct and install Pioneer Water Tanks to keep the tank within warranty.

                  Concrete is recyclable and requires specialized machinery to break the tank down and make it into aggregate.

                  The engineering and durability of the ZINCALUME® Steel components of Pioneer Water Tanks enable water storage solutions in intensive environments. Pioneer Water Tanks engineering withstands earthquake zones, cyclonic regions, and wildfire emergencies.

                  > Learn More about ZINCALUME® Steel

                  The flexible steel walls help during earthquakes to allow for movement without breaking the Pioneer Water Tank. The design of the internal liner and tank shell enables them to move independently of one another. This flexibility allows Pioneer Water Tanks to withstand emergencies where a non-flexible structure of concrete water tanks can fail.

                  Pioneer Water Tanks offer a usable water supply during and after an emergency where a concrete tank will often fail. The design and construction of concrete water tanks determine how well they stand during an emergency.

                  While water doesn’t easily pass through concrete, vapor moves at a rate depending on the porosity and permeability of the concrete. The amount of water loss from concrete tanks also depends on the location. Pioneer Water Tanks safely store water within the AQUALINER® Fresh tank liner.

                  Pioneer Water Tanks keep water fresh and clean

                   

                  The BPA-free, NSF-61 certified tank liner is protected within the ZINCALUME® steel tank body and sealed roof. The sealed water supply within the five-layered AQUALINER® Fresh tank liner reduces water loss to that of only natural evaporation.

                  Pioneer Water Tanks America is the distributor of top-tier water storage solutions. Our network of water professionals provides localized service and onsite installations. Call (877) 223-7784 or fill out the contact form below to speak to a representative.


                  Pioneer Water Tanks America is ready to provide top-tier water storage solutions with our network of local providers.

                  Call Now (877) 223-7784